Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm calling $(document).ready(function(){...}) in a JS file included halfway through my page's body (I know it should go at the bottom, there are reasons why it's in the middle though)

Whenever I load the page, I get in the console:

Uncaught TypeError: Cannot call method 'ready' of undefined 

The thing is, it still works! all of the code I was putting in document.ready is still (somehow) being run, and it executes perfectly. I've tried just removing the $(document).ready() line, but then the code doesn't get run.

I'm working on Mac OSX Mountain Lion, and testing in Chrome

edit:

jQuery is imported in the tag, and everything, including jQuery is actually working, I'm just trying to get rid of the error.

edit #2:

I fixed the problem, but I really don't know what was happening. I rewrote the function I was giving to $(document).ready(), and it started working again. I think I was using some jQuery stuff a little bit wrong, but I guess I'll never know what was really happening.

share|improve this question
    
Did you import the jquery src? – Sterling Archer Jun 28 '13 at 16:23
    
make sure your jQuery lib imported. And try to change like -> $(function(){....}) – Aldi Unanto Jun 28 '13 at 16:26
    
@AldiUnanto and PRPGFerret: If $ were completely undefined, it would be a different error. – T.J. Crowder Jun 28 '13 at 16:26
2  
I've deleted my answer, because it didn't fit the symptom that the code does get run. The only thing I can think of is that there is something else calling a function called ready elsewhere, and it's that call, not yours, that's failing. The answer, as is frequently the case, is to debug it. Put a breakpoint on the $(document).ready line in the debugger built into your browser and step through the code statement by statement. (You can also insert the line debugger; just before it, which is a hardcoded breakpoint. The debugger will stop on it provided you have it open.) – T.J. Crowder Jun 28 '13 at 16:47
    
Cool, I'll try that. Thanks – hoylemd Jun 28 '13 at 17:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.