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I'm trying to make a java function that given in input a video it generates a sets of images by seconds, so far this is what I've got:

public static void decodeAndCaptureFrames(String inputfilename, String outputfolder, int width, int height, double seconds) throws InputFormatException, EncoderException { double duration = getVideoLenght(inputfilename); int index = 0;

    Runtime runtime = Runtime.getRuntime();
    for(double s = 0; s < duration; s+= seconds)
    {
        String outString = outputfolder + File.separator + index + ".png";
        String cmd = "ffmpeg.exe -i "+ inputfilename +" -f image2 -t 0.001 -ss "+ s +" -s "+ width +"x"+ height +" "+outString;

        try {
            Process p = runtime.exec(cmd);
            p.waitFor()
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println("problema nell'esecuzione del runtime.exec");
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        System.out.println(cmd);
        index++;
    }   
}

However the code is really slow and it only converts the first two images even if I get the print of the further images. Since I'm using this external exe, can somebody tell me if I'm doing something wrong with the runtime and the process? thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Move -ss before -i so it becomes an input option. It is much faster (but can be less accurate). Use -vframes 1 to get one frame instead of trying to declare a very short duration with -t 0.001. Use the scale filter instead of -s if you want to preserve the aspect: -vf scale=320:-1. –  LordNeckbeard Jun 28 '13 at 17:34
    
thanks! It's really much faster now, is there also a way to tell him to automatically overwrite a file if it's already there? –  Pievis Jun 28 '13 at 19:18
    
Use -y as a global option, or, conversely, use -n if you want ffmpeg to skip encoding a file if it exists. –  LordNeckbeard Jun 28 '13 at 20:20

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