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I have the following structure in my DOM and I would like to select only the first level children from a specified class. How to do this in JQuery?

Please note that I have nested divs with same css class.

My HTML:

<div class="t">
    <div>title</div>
    <div class="ch">
        <input type="text name="input1" value="" id="i1">
    </div>
    <div class="t">
        <div>sub title</div>
        <div class="ch">
            <input type="text name="input2" value="" id="i2">
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

What I need to get: When I find all elements with class 't' and iterate, I want to get the children with class 'ch' that are under (not the ones in the inner div with class 't').

Javascript

$(".t").each(function() {
    //Get the elements in '.ch' for $(this) and process.
});

Thanks for your help.

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closed as off-topic by Servy, bluefeet, Travis J, bfavaretto, Makoto Jun 28 '13 at 18:19

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1  
First level means not nested under other sub elements. Do you mean that, or only the first one that appears? –  jcsanyi Jun 28 '13 at 17:38
2  
You really need to stop, figure out what you need, and update your question to clearly explain it. I can't tell if the nested .t elements should be included when getting the .ch elements or not. –  Crazy Train Jun 28 '13 at 17:55
1  
@M99 is that what you want? jsfiddle.net/c68xR/2 Select every .t and top lvl .ch? –  Karl-André Gagnon Jun 28 '13 at 18:02
2  
...you know, if you're having that hard of a time expressing which nodes should be selected, you could use some HTML comments to annotate the ones you're targeting. –  Crazy Train Jun 28 '13 at 18:19
1  
I don't know where JSON comes in to all this. Are you saying you're creating a JSON structure (a string) comprised of some of the properties of the .ch elements? –  Crazy Train Jun 28 '13 at 18:24

5 Answers 5

You can use children selector

Something like

$('.t').children('.ch')

This is equivalent to

$('.t > .ch') // Child selector

And you can remove the each loop from the code as the selector selects the elements you are looking for.

Edit

For First level you can use a combination of child selector and parents method

$('.t > .ch').filter(function() {
   return $(this).parents('.t').length === 1 
})

Check Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Can you elaborate on why using the children() method would be better? .t > .ch is definitely not deprecated, and is a valid CSS selector that can be fed to querySelectorAll(), which is usually faster. –  Frédéric Hamidi Jun 28 '13 at 17:35
2  
This doesn't actually use each the way the OP specified –  jcsanyi Jun 28 '13 at 17:35
2  
@Sushanth-- I confirm that child selector is faster : jsperf.com/child-selector-vs-children23 –  Karl-André Gagnon Jun 28 '13 at 17:41
2  
I only want first level children. not all children. For ex: if you take the first div with class "t", I want only the elements from first "ch". –  M99 Jun 28 '13 at 17:41
1  
This answer is incorrect. It will match both the outer and inner elements. The OP stated to only match the outer elements. –  Travis J Jun 28 '13 at 17:43

Playing guessing games here, but is this what you're looking for?

$(".t").each(function(i) {
   var childrenCHOnly = $(this).children('.ch');
   /* Do work to childrenCHOnly */
});

jsFiddle


Or this:

 $(".t").filter(function(i) { return $(this).find('.t').length; }).children('.ch').first();

It will filter to only get Elements of .t that have inner elements of .t and then get the first child .ch

jsFiddle


Of course you could also say:

$(".t").first().children(".ch").first().each(function(i) { ...

|OR|

$(".t > .ch").first().each(function(i) { ...

Of course, both of these would only grab the very first .t, regardless if it was a parent to more or not

share|improve this answer
    
+1 But I think OP wants the top level .t, which doesn't necessarily imply that there are nested .t elements. The question isn't perfectly clear on that. It may be safer to do $(this).closest(".t").length === 0 in order to exclude ones that have a .t ancestor. –  Crazy Train Jun 28 '13 at 17:39
    
@CrazyTrain Too true, that's why i've been making some updates, tho it's really hard to tell exactly what s/he wants? –  SpYk3HH Jun 28 '13 at 17:42
    
Agreed. If it can be guaranteed that there will always be nesting, then your first solution would work perfectly. –  Crazy Train Jun 28 '13 at 17:42
    
I want to read each div with class 't' and create JSON with the elements under that as a hierarchy (more like a tree). Nesting you see in Divs would be in JSON also. Thanks. –  M99 Jun 28 '13 at 17:46
    
@M99 ok, did you see my latest update, I added one new example, perhaps that would fit? –  SpYk3HH Jun 28 '13 at 17:47
$(".t").children(".ch").each(function() {
  // do stuff here
});

If you want to target the elements inside of .ch element, you can do something like this:

$(".t").children(".ch").children().each(function() {
  // do stuff here
});
share|improve this answer
1  
This isn't actually the way the OP is using each –  jcsanyi Jun 28 '13 at 17:37

If you want the top level .t, you can use this :

$('.t').not('.t > .t').children('.ch')

Then once you got every .ch you need, you can iterate through them.

If you want to iterate through the .t, then you can get the children inside the loop :

$('.t').not('.t > .t').each(function(){
    var ch = $(this).children('.ch')
})

Fiddle : http://jsfiddle.net/c68xR/


If you want to select every .t and every .ch of the first lvl .t, that's what you want :

$('.t').each(function(){
    var $this = $(this);
    $this.css('border', 'red 1px solid');
    if(!$this.is('.t > .t')){
        $this.children('.ch').css('border', 'blue 1px solid');
    }
})

Fiddle : http://jsfiddle.net/c68xR/2/

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like you understood the questioner's goal better than the rest of us. Good job :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Jun 28 '13 at 18:14
    
@FrédéricHamidi, gotta admit, it was hard :) Thank! –  Karl-André Gagnon Jun 28 '13 at 18:14

Assuming you really want to loop through each .t element, and find the children of each one independently - which the other answers seem to have missed - I think this is what you want:

$(".t").each(function() {
    var childen = $(this).children('.ch');
});

For the sample HTML given in the original question, we'll loop through the each 2 times - once for each .t element. The first time through, only the first .ch element will be selected, and the second time through, only the second .ch element will be selected.

children() is different from find() in that it only finds immediate (first-level) children of the element it's called on - in this case, $(this), which is the .t that was found in the current pass through the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
You understood the question correctly, but $(this).children('.ch') will give all children (even the ones under the nested divs with clss 't'). –  M99 Jun 28 '13 at 17:55
1  
@M99: Which is it... he understood the question correctly, or you don't want the .ch elements in the nested .t elements? –  Crazy Train Jun 28 '13 at 17:57
    
@m99 No, children() only gets immediate children. So when the each is at the first .t, it'll only get the first .ch. When the each gets to the second .t though, it will get the second .ch, because it's a first-level child of that .t. –  jcsanyi Jun 28 '13 at 18:01
    
Well, I'm giving to +1 this and every other answer here. If someone posted a Fibonacci function written in Clojure, I'd probably upvote that one too. –  Crazy Train Jun 28 '13 at 18:10

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