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I am trying to achieve a typical layout which has a Header, Middle and Footer area. I especially want to make sure that the Footer is never any higher than the bottom of the visible screen. Put another way: when a Middle has short content, the Footer should be exactly at the bottom of the page; when a Middle has tall content, the Footer can be below the fold and must be below the bottom of the Middle content.

One additional constraint is that I am working with a ton of existing HTML which I cannot change wholesale -- I can mostly only change the CSS involved. The Middle area is sometimes a table tag and sometimes a div. And therein lies the problem -- div and table behave differently here (in latest Chrome, Safari & FF).

What CSS can I use that will work for both table and div (and that works in a reasonable swath of desktop browsers, lets say anything from the last 3 years)?

For the < table > based page, the css is set up like so:

  • Size html & body to width & height 100%, no margins
  • Footer height is hard set to 20px, no margins
  • Header height is hard set to 100px, no margins
  • Middle height is 100%
  • Middle has a top margin of -20px and bottom margin of -100px

Which has the desired effect on < table >:

  • The 100% height for html, body and Middle makes the Middle at least as tall as the window.
  • The margins on Middle this have the effect of pulling the Middle area to the top of the page underneath the Header, and pulling the Footer up so that it is on the bottom of the Middle.

However, for < div > it fails. The "pulling" effect is the same and works well. But the height of the div seems to be the height of the Header plus the height of the window.

I've tried tweaking the box model of different pieces; I've tried "display: table;" on the div.

Here is some HTML which demonstrates the issue. Just remove the "display: none;" for div.middle or table.middle to see the behavior for each.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <style>
        html, body {
            margin: 0;
            height: 100%;
            width: 100%;
        }
        .header { 
            width: 90%;
            height: 100px; 
            background: rgba(0,255,0,.25); 
        }
        table.middle { 
            display: none; 
            box-model: border-box; 
            height: 100%;
            margin-bottom: -20px;
            margin-top: -100px;
            padding-top: 100px;
            width: 100%;
            background: rgba(255,0,0,.25); 
        }
        div.middle { 
            display: none;
            box-model: border-box; 
            height: 100%;
            margin-bottom: -20px;
            margin-top: -100px;
            padding-top: 100px;
            width: 100%;
            background: rgba(255,0,0,.25); 
        }
        .footer {
            width: 90%;
            height: 20px;
            background: rgba(0,0,255,.25); 
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div class="header">
        header
    </div>
    <table class="middle"><tr><td>
        body
    </td></tr></table>
    <div class="middle">
        body
    </div>
    <div class="footer">
        footer
    </div>
</body>
</html>
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

[UPDATED ANSWER]

I see what's happening here. Your div has padding-top:100px which makes its total height 100% + 100px. Your table has the same thing, but the table does weird things so that it doesn't cause the issue. E.g. the table always stretches to fill the space in a way that the div won't. Note how the word "body" is centered with your table but not with your div.

If you remove the padding-top:100px; from the div CSS, it fixes the issue, except then your middle area overlaps the header. Since you can't edit your HTML, you can use CSS to give whatever the first element in the main section a margin-top of 100px, to put that buffer back in there without adding to the height of the div. Something like this should work:

div.middle:first-child{
   margin:top: 100px;
}

[OLD ANSWER]

Here's a JSFiddle with my solution. Basically, wrap the whole thing in a container div,

<div class="container">
   [all your HTML]
</div>

...and give it a min-height of 100%. This way the container will be 100% when the content is small, but will expand when the content is larger than 100%.

.container { 
    min-height: 100%;
    position: relative;
}

You also make it position:relative because you have to position the footer absolutely to stick to the bottom edge of it no matter what:

.footer {
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0px;
}

See my JSFiddle to see the example--it works with both your div and your table.

PS: You had them with 100% height, but a better emulation of large/small content is to use pixels, say toggle it between 60px and 600px. Also, I removed your margin-bottom:-20px from them because they weren't needed anymore, since making the footer absolute removes it from the flow of the document.

share|improve this answer
    
Good work. But I don't want the Footer completely stuck to the bottom -- I need it to get pushed down if Middle is too tall to fit in the page. I tried to explain but probably wasn't clear enough. –  swanky gorgon Jun 28 '13 at 18:20
    
@zipquincy, in this code the footer is stuck to the bottom of the "middle" area when the middle is taller than the page. If the middle is shorter than the page, it is stuck to the bottom of the page. Isn't that what you wanted? –  brentonstrine Jun 28 '13 at 18:27
    
Question: does your middle section depend on the height:100%, or was that just for the example? Using percent is a little weird here, since if you have more content than will fit, it's going to get larger than 100% and overflow. Is that the intent? –  brentonstrine Jun 28 '13 at 18:52
1  
The simple answer seems to be: "the padding-top does not actually apply to the table". Using "box-sizing: border-box;" actually fixes this problem after all, although I swear I had tried that! –  swanky gorgon Jun 28 '13 at 21:58
    
Ah, I wouldn't have got that. You should create an answer to your own question and mark it as the correct answer. –  brentonstrine Jun 29 '13 at 0:29

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