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I'd like to disassemble the MBR (first 512 bytes) of a bootable x86 disk that I have. I have copied the MBR to a file using

dd if=/dev/my-device of=mbr bs=512 count=1

Any suggestions for a Linux utility that can disassemble the file mbr?

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6 Answers

up vote 41 down vote accepted

You can use objdump. According to this article the syntax is:

objdump -D -b binary -mi386 -Maddr16,data16 mbr
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can you explain what the options you specify do? –  Hawken Nov 17 '12 at 14:18
4  
or --target instead of -b. -D is "disassemble the contents of all sections"; -b bfdname or --target=bfdname will force reading as specified object-code format (not elf but raw binary in our case); -m machine will specify the architecture to use (in our file there is no header with arch info). -M options are options of disassembler; addr16,data16 are used to "specify the default address size and operand size" (treat code as i8086 one in the universal x86 disasm engine) –  osgx Nov 28 '12 at 16:41
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The GNU tool is called objdump, for example:

objdump -D -b binary -m i8086 <file>
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I like ndisasm for this purpose. It comes with the NASM assembler, which is free and open source and included in the package repositories of most linux distros.

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I like this answer better. Easier to use, and I could install nasm on OS X - objdump wasn't there, and I don't want to build it from source. –  user529758 Oct 28 '12 at 13:12
    
@H2CO3 NASM is usually be preinstalled on OS-X... –  Hawken Nov 17 '12 at 3:42
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sudo dd if=/dev/sda bs=512 count=1 | ndisasm -b16 -o7c00h -

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ndisasm -b16 -o7c00h -a -s7c3eh mbr

Explanation - from ndisasm manpage

  • -b = Specifies 16-, 32- or 64-bit mode. The default is 16-bit mode.
  • -o = Specifies the notional load address for the file. This option causes ndisasm to get the addresses it lists down the left hand margin, and the target addresses of PC-relative jumps and calls, right.
  • -a = Enables automatic (or intelligent) sync mode, in which ndisasm will attempt to guess where synchronisation should be performed, by means of examining the target addresses of the relative jumps and calls it disassembles.
  • -s = Manually specifies a synchronisation address, such that ndisasm will not output any machine instruction which encompasses bytes on both sides of the address. Hence the instruction which starts at that address will be correctly disassembled.
  • mbr = The file to be disassembled.
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what does this do as opposed to simple ndisasm? Can you explain the options –  Hawken Nov 17 '12 at 14:16
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Could you explain what those options mean and do? Understanding an answering is better than just getting one. –  ArtB Nov 17 '12 at 17:33
    
-b specifies 16-, 32- or 64-bit mode. The default is 16-bit mode. -o is the notional load address for the file. This option causes ndisasm to get the addresses it lists down the left hand margin, and the target addresses of PC-relative jumps and calls, right. -s specifies a synchronisation address, such that ndisasm will not output any machine instruction which encompasses bytes on both sides of the address. Hence the instruction which starts at that address will be correctly disassembled. –  Janus Troelsen May 6 '13 at 18:49
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Or for a fancy program in the style of the Norton days, see http://hte.sf.net/

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protected by H2CO3 Oct 28 '12 at 13:12

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