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I am writing a field services HTML5 application that runs on the Google Chrome web browser on Windows laptops that have a GPS chips in them. I am using the html5 geolocation api to get the user's location. This works fine as long as the user has an ip address (either from wifi or a wired network connection).

However, when the laptop does not have a network connection, geolocation fails even though the laptop has a GPS chip. I am worried that the browser is not smart enough to use the GPS chip and is instead always wanting to call Google's network geolocation service, which fails if there is no network. Anyone know if that's the case?

Is there a way to make Google Chrome geolocation work on a laptop that has a GPS chip but no network connection? Seems silly that it doesn't work!

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This might be helpful: stackoverflow.com/questions/7346050/… – net.uk.sweet Mar 5 '14 at 1:49
up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

Although not ideal, you could use a 3rd party desktop app to write location data to a file on disk. If the file is written to the web folder, this could be read using javascript. Windows gps loggins software: http://gpsgate.com/support/nmea_logger

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This worked, but instead of writing nmea to a local file, there's a simpler way. I'm using GpsGate Client's "GPS in browser" feature, which means that it provides a web server at localhost that serves me the GPS location data as json over http. Works great. Thanks! – Category6 Mar 7 '14 at 21:24

Have you tried setting the enableHighAccuracy property to true?

navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(
     processGeolocation,
     // Optional settings below
     geolocationError,
     {
         timeout: 0,
         enableHighAccuracy: true,
         maximumAge: Infinity
     }
);

Ref

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Yes, already doing that. No effect. Thanks though. – Category6 Mar 6 '14 at 2:55
    
Are you running the HTML app by running Apache locally or by opening the file in the browser? The two solutions could have different security/permissions. – Chris Gunawardena Mar 6 '14 at 3:29
    
My application is served from a server, not a local file. It uses the html5 cache.manifest to cache it in the local browser so that it can work offline. – Category6 Mar 7 '14 at 21:22

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