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How do I correctly set a javascript object's attribute? My console.log() shouldn't return undefined.

First I declare a class:

function SignUpForm(myFormElement) {
  var eForm, email, password;

  this.eForm = myFormElement;
}

Then on page load, I instantiate the class:

$(document).ready(function(){
  myFormElement = $('form');
  myForm = new SignUpForm(myFormElement);
  console.log(myForm.eForm); // Returns undefined :(
});
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closed as unclear what you're asking by meagar, Joe, Omar, dove, Dimitri M Mar 7 at 9:20

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
You don't need var eForm, email, password; there. That isn't how you declare variables on this. –  meagar Jun 28 '13 at 18:29
1  
var eForm and this.eForm are two totally different things. –  crush Jun 28 '13 at 18:29
2  
I was unable to reproduce this behavior: jsfiddle.net/eeC94 –  Travis J Jun 28 '13 at 18:29
    
The var statement is not needed, otherwise it should work just fine. –  adeneo Jun 28 '13 at 18:29
1  
@Joe doesn't matter. Even if there were no form, $('form') still wouldn't be undefined, it would be a jQuery object matching 0 elements. It's impossible for the code do be doing what he says it's doing; he must have some error on his console, elsewhere in his code. –  meagar Jun 28 '13 at 18:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
function SignUpForm(myFormElement) {
  this.eForm = myFormElement;
}

you can safely remove your declared scope variables as they don't do anything.

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You do not need return this;. –  marteljn Jun 28 '13 at 18:40
    
absolutely right. Missed the new keyword. –  bluetoft Jun 28 '13 at 18:41

You maybe want something like this?!

HTML:

<form>
    <input name="email" />
    <input name="password" />
</form>

Javascript:

Here you define SignUpForm class and in eForm you serialize form:

function SignUpForm(myFormElement) {
    this.eForm = myFormElement.serialize();
}

$(document).ready(function(){
    myFormElement = $('form');
    myForm = new SignUpForm(myFormElement);
    console.log(myForm.eForm);
});

jsFiddle

EDIT: If eForm store element, then your code is ok ... but console.log(myForm.eForm); doesnt make much sense, and for rest you can serialize that form element console.log(myForm.eForm.serialize());.

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Why would you serialize the form? –  Donny P Jun 28 '13 at 18:38
    
@DonnyP - And what shoud has eForm? Its look like debug value or something –  Shaddow Jun 28 '13 at 18:39

I see nothing wrong with this currently. I don't use log much, but am not sure if you can "log" an object, or if it has to be a type string. Other than that, the object is being set properly. myForm is an object, eForm is a property of the object with it's value being the jquery object of the selector "FORM".

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