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Please, firstly, is there an IDE where indentation is being taken care of? secondly, I have an indentation error in my code. Could anyone point out where the indentation is needed in my code?

p = [0.2,0.2,0.2,0.2,0.2]

world = ['green','red','red','green','green']
z = 'red'
pHit = 0.6
pMiss = 0.2
def sense(p, z):
  q=[]
  for i in range(len(p)):
      hit = (z==world[i])
      q.append(p[i]*(hit*pHit + (1-hit)*pMiss))
      return q

print sense(p,z)
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You can use Python IDLE. –  Rohit Jain Jun 28 '13 at 18:36
    
Almost any IDE will take care of indentation for you. –  Henry Keiter Jun 28 '13 at 18:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your return statement is not in the right place. Additionally, pHit, pMiss and world variables should be defined in a function scope:

def sense(p, z):
    pHit = 0.6
    pMiss = 0.2
    world = ['green','red','red','green','green']

    q = []
    for i in range(len(p)):
        hit = (z==world[i])
        q.append(p[i] * (hit * pHit + (1 - hit) * pMiss))
    return q

p = [0.2,0.2,0.2,0.2,0.2]
z = 'red'
print sense(p,z)
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  1. Is that code right?? (The indentation)
  2. Your return doesn't seem to be in the right place.
  3. Please! Please!! Please!!! Follow PEP-8 for naming of variables and coding style.
  4. No, There is no IDE that can read your mind, and guess what indent you want on a certain statement...

But, you can re-indent your code:

p = [0.2,0.2,0.2,0.2,0.2]

world = ['green','red','red','green','green']
z = 'red'
pHit = 0.6
pMiss = 0.2
def sense(p, z):
  q=[]
  for i in range(len(p)):
      hit = (z==world[i])
      q.append(p[i]*(hit*pHit + (1-hit)*pMiss))
  return q # dedented

print sense(p,z)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you but the code is absolutely correct. –  helpdesk Jun 28 '13 at 18:57
    
@henryjoseph Please don't take offended, I did not mean to offend.. (Code thing is for the indent..) –  Pradyun Jun 29 '13 at 5:42

In python you can use tabs or spaces as indentation, but you must remain consistent in what you use and how many of them there are. Take a closer look at the following:

def sense(p, z):
  q=[]
  for i in range(len(p)):
      hit = (z==world[i])
      q.append(p[i]*(hit*pHit + (1-hit)*pMiss))
      return q

Whether or not the return statement is where it belongs, the issue is with the lines

  q=[]
  for i in range(len(p)):

relative to

  for i in range(len(p)):
      hit = (z==world[i])
      q.append(p[i]*(hit*pHit + (1-hit)*pMiss))
      return q

Notice how there are TWO spaces before the first two lines mentioned and SIX spaces before the body of the for loop. Every indentation level should be a multiple of a single indent. So if you want to use two spaces:

def sense(p, z):
  q=[]
  for i in range(len(p)):
    hit = (z==world[i])
    q.append(p[i]*(hit*pHit + (1-hit)*pMiss))
    return q

and if you want to use four spaces:

def sense(p, z):
    q=[]
    for i in range(len(p)):
        hit = (z==world[i])
        q.append(p[i]*(hit*pHit + (1-hit)*pMiss))
        return q

I typically go with four and set up my environment to map the tab character to four spaces.

That said...I too agree on moving the return statement. But at least now you can run your code and figure out if/why you want to move it.

You should probably read through all of PEP-8, but particularly the section on indentation

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1  
While I agree that, in general, 'every indentation level should be a multiple of a single indent', it doesn't have to be. Indenting one block by two spaces and the next by six will not cause an error. –  Paul Griffiths Jun 28 '13 at 18:56
    
@PaulGriffiths You're right! I didn't actually think you could do that. But now that I take a closer look I realize OP's code doesn't throw any error to begin with... –  Brian Jun 28 '13 at 19:00
    
I did wonder about the question, to be honest, since when you do have an indentation error, it'll always tell you which line it's on... –  Paul Griffiths Jun 28 '13 at 19:04

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