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In python, I have a list called "list" that looks like the following:

[{'lastname': 'lname1', 'firstname': 'fname1', 'shortname': 'SN1'},
{'lastname': 'lname2', 'firstname': 'fname2', 'shortname': 'SN2'},
{'lastname': 'lname3', 'firstname': 'fname3', 'shortname': 'SN3'}]

I need to be able to access each of these attributes, for EACH item in the list. So I have to get the lastname of each user, firstname of each user, etc

As this is a list, I have been trying to do it as follows:

for idx in enumerate(list):
        print(list[idx])

But I get an error saying the list indices must be integers, not tuples.

So trying this:

for idx in enumerate(list):
        print(idx)

I get output like this:

(0, {'lastname': 'lname1', 'firstname': 'fname1', 'shortname': 'SN1'})
(1, {'lastname': 'lname2', 'firstname': 'fname2', 'shortname': 'SN2'})
(2, {'lastname': 'lname3', 'firstname': 'fname3', 'shortname': 'SN3'})

All I want is to be able to get the index, so I can iterate through each list item and say

firstname = list[idx]["firstname"]
lastname = list[idx]["lastname"]

And so on.

Note: If I say something like

print(list[0]["firstname"]) 

it works perfectly.

What am I doing wrong? Or what do I need to do? Thanks!

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1  
Please don't name your list list, as this masks a literal in Python. –  thegrinner Jun 28 '13 at 18:42
    
I'll be sure to change that! –  elykl33t Jun 28 '13 at 18:46
    
A better way to use enumerate would be like this: for idx, item in enumerate(list): –  junkaholik Jun 28 '13 at 18:52

4 Answers 4

for item in list:
    item['firstname']

Although this is a bad idea to use the name list for your list, as this is already the name of the constructor for lists in Python's standard lib.

enumerate is usefull in case you need the index of the item in the list. It yields a tuple containing the index of the item and the item itself (as you experienced for yourself).

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Thanks!!!! Will flag this as correct as soon as it lets me! –  elykl33t Jun 28 '13 at 18:53

Unlike JavaScript, iterating over a sequence in Python yields elements, not indexes.

print idx['lastname']
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Lists indeces are integers.

>>> x = ['test','test2','test3']
>>> x[1]
'test2'

What you have is a list dictionaries. So what you would have to do is iterate through the list and through the dictionary. Like so:

>>> x = [{'cat':'lol'},{'tigers':'lions'}]
>>> for z in x:
...  for d in z:
...   print z[d]
...
lol
lions

So if you just want the name:

for d in list:
 print d['firstname']
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You don't need enumerate, Use it when you need the indexes of the elements, which you don't here..

What you seem to want to do is:

for di in mylist: # for .. in ... : Iterates over the contents of ...
   for elem in di:
      print elem,':', di[elem]

or

for di in mylist:
    print di['firstname'], di['lastname']
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