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I have an object. It initializes a button to alert "Hello!" when it is clicked. Why won't this work?

jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/kUT52/1/

HTML

<button>Test</button>

JS

var MyObject = {
  testValue: "Hello!",

  testFunction: function() {
    alert(this.testValue);
  },

  init: function(button) {
    button.click(this.testFunction());
  }
}

$(document).ready(function(){
  var buttonInstance = new MyObject();
  var button = $('button');
  buttonInstance.init(button);
});
share|improve this question
3  
Your code makes no sense! You can't initialize a new object literal like that. If you want to use new and treat it like a "constructor", you have to make MyObject a function. Otherwise, MyObject is an object literal and you can access it statically - MyObject.testValue –  Ian Jun 28 '13 at 20:24
    
Mind blown @Ian. That makes js objects make so much more sense, thank you. –  Donny P Jun 28 '13 at 20:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Whenever you put () behind a function reference, you are executing the function. You have to pass the function reference to .click, not what the function returns (unless the function returns a function that you want to use as event handler).

Example:

button.click(this.testFunction);

But now you have another problem: Inside the function, this will refer to the DOM element and not to the object, so accessing this.testValue will return undefined.

You can use jQuery's $.proxy function to fix this:

button.click($.proxy(this.testFunction, this));

Now this will refer to the object, and you can get a reference to the clicked element via event.target.

share|improve this answer

For two reasons:

  • You are using testFunction() instead of testFunction when you bind the event, so you will be calling the function and binding the (undefined) return value.

  • When you use a method as a function, it's no longer attached to the object, so the context will not be the object when the callback is called, but the global window object.

Use the proxy method to make a function that calls the method with the right context:

button.click($.proxy(this.testFunction, this));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Guffa, is it possible to use .bind(this) instead of $.proxy()? –  Donny P Jun 28 '13 at 20:22
    
@DonnyP Yeah they accomplish the same thing –  Ian Jun 28 '13 at 20:22
    
@DonnyP: Yes, but that doesn't work in all browsers. That's why proxy is there. –  Guffa Jun 28 '13 at 20:23
    
Is the syntax button.click(this.testFunction.bind(this)) ? –  Donny P Jun 28 '13 at 20:23
1  
@Guffa What's funny to me is that jQuery doesn't even bother checking for Function.prototype.bind, they just always use their custom way –  Ian Jun 28 '13 at 20:29

That's an object literal, and you'd normally use it like so :

var MyObject = {
    testValue: "Hello!",

    testFunction: function() {
        alert(MyObject.testValue);
    },

    init: function(button) {
        button.on('click', this.testFunction);
    }
}

var button = $('button');
MyObject.init(button);

FIDDLE

or passing the object:

var MyObject = {
    testValue: "Hello!",

    testFunction: function(e) {
        alert(e.data.obj.testValue);
    },

    init: function(button) {
        button.on('click', {obj: this}, this.testFunction);
    }
}

var button = $('button');
MyObject.init(button);

FIDDLE

share|improve this answer
    
Well it got the alert working, but still alerts "undefined" :P –  Donny P Jun 28 '13 at 20:20
    
@DonnyP - didn't notice! That's because wintin the scope of the testFunction, this would be the button when called that way, not the object. You either have to reference the object directly, or pass this as a parameter. –  adeneo Jun 28 '13 at 20:22

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