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I have the same problem which keeps coming up in my Ruby-on-Rails app (my first app, which I inherited). I have an admin dashboard where the view iterates over the users and puts some data about them up in an html table, one row per user. Currently, I have the view running the iteration in embedded ruby, and looking for the data on the user, sometimes processing it, and putting it in the table, row by row as it iterates.

I'm pretty new to rails, but it seems like having the program do so much of the database calls from the view seems like it is breaking the MVC model, and not very secure. I'm now trying to use some data that I will be calling from our payment processing company (Stripe), and it seems like it is very insecure to do so from the View. Specifically, I'm planning to add a column with customers locations, based on the zip code they gave stripe. This requires calling Stripe for the credit card associated with their account.

Here's the problem. I see three potential ways to do it, only one of which works (but I think it's the wrong one, so I'm hoping you can show me another way.)

  1. Iterate over the users in the controller. Fetch the data needed, and do... something with it that lets me had it to the View. Iterate over the users in the view, fetching the data only associated with that user from the controller, and creating one table row per user. Again, not sure how to do that.
  2. Iterate over the data in the controller, and somehow feed the data to the view where it knows it is receiving data and it should put each iteration in a row (and each item from the iteration in a cell. Is this possible?
  3. What I'm doing now: Do nothing in the Controller except creating a local variable of all my users @users=User.all, do everything in the view.

Right now, the code in the view (for one of these examples. I have this happening several times in several Views, accessing all our users on a users as customers page, a users and community engagement page, and another page for every product.) looks like this:

<table id="table_of_users2">
    <thead>
        <th width="200px">First Name</th>
        <th width="200px">Last Name</th>
        <th width="200px">Email</th>
        <th width="200px">Number Representing Community Activity</th>
        <th width="200px">Favorites</th>
        <th width="200px">Comments</th>
</thead>
<tbody>
    <% @users.each do |user|%>
        <% @our_community_activity_number=0 %>
        <% @times_faved=0 %>
        <% @comments=0 %>
        <% user.engagements.each do |engagement| %>
            <% if engagement.our_community_activity==true %>
                <% @our_community_activity_number+=1%>
            <% end %>
            <% if engagement.favorite==true%>
                <% @times_faved+=1%>
            <% end %>
            <% if engagement.comment!="" || engagement.comment!=nil %>
                <% @comments +=1 %>
            <% end %>
        <% end %>
        <tr>
            <td width="200px"><%= user.first_name%> </td>
            <td width="200px"><%= user.last_name %></td>
            <td width="200px"><%= mail_to("#{user.email}")%></td>
            <td width="200px"><%= @our_community_activity_number %></td>
            <td width="200px"><%= @times_faved==0?0:@meals_faved %>
            <td width="200px"><%= @comments %></td>
        </tr>
    <% end%>
</tbody>
</table>

How can I rewrite this so that it is more secure and I can safely add their location information from the payment processing company to the page? Am I correct in thinking I can't safely do that in this way?

Thanks. I'm new at Rails, and I keep running into this same problem again and again.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I dont' see anything horribly wrong with this. There's no data access happening in the views, but there is some logic. If you wanted to remove the logic, you

UserDashboardModel = Struct.new(:first_name, :last_name, :email, :our_community_activity_number, :times_faved, :comments)

def dashboard
  @users = User.all.map do |user_record|
    UserDashboardModel.new.tap do |user|
      user.first_name = user_record.first_name
      user.last_name = user_record.last_name
      user.email = user_record.email
      user.our_community_activity_number = user_record.engagements.select(&:our_community_activity).count
      user.favorite = user_record.engagements.select(&:favorite).count
      user.comments = user_record.engagements.select{|e| e.comment.present?}.count
    end
  end
end

then in the view, it's much simpler:

<table> 
   <thead>
        <th width="200px">First Name</th>
        <th width="200px">Last Name</th>
        <th width="200px">Email</th>
        <th width="200px">Number Representing Community Activity</th>
        <th width="200px">Favorites</th>
        <th width="200px">Comments</th>
</thead>
   <tbody>
       <% @users.each do |user| %>
        <tr>
            <td width="200px"><%= user.first_name%> </td>
            <td width="200px"><%= user.last_name %></td>
            <td width="200px"><%= mail_to(user.email)%></td>
            <td width="200px"><%= user.our_community_activity_number %></td>
            <td width="200px"><%= user.favorite %>
            <td width="200px"><%= user.comments %></td>
        </tr>
    <% end%>
</tbody>
</table>

Is this better? subjectively --- the view is definitely dumber. That's a plus. the controller is harder to reason about though -- there are ways around this, like building your UserDashboardModel array in another method somewhere.

share|improve this answer
    
So here you are giving the dashboard it's own model, is that correct? Or is that in the controller? –  ctaymor Jul 1 '13 at 16:38
    
It has its own "viewmodel" -- but it's just a class. It is defined in the controller's definition in my example. –  Jesse Wolgamott Jul 1 '13 at 16:46

Ruby is notorious for it's thin controllers, it's not a bad thing it's just the way active_model applications tend to set up :)

You should be doing a lot of this heavy lifting in your model, not your view or controller. You should ask the user for it's engagement_metrics and this is where a user loops over it's engagements and figures out the our_community_activity_number, times_faved and comments.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I don't totally understand what you are suggesting. The View should iterate over the users and ask the user for their engagement metrics and the user should loop over its engagements and pass them back as hash? And the model should have a method for this? The code I inherited only has associations and whether/how code is accessible (ie. attr_accessible) in the models, but it was the previous coder's first project and so may not be totally following convention. So I'm thinking what you are saying is have a method in the model, and call it in the view for each user the view iterates over? –  ctaymor Jun 28 '13 at 21:12
    
Jesse has a better/more detailed answer than mine. Your desire to move logic out of the view is correct. –  Jeff Price Jul 1 '13 at 15:23

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