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This might be a stupid question, but it keeps bothering me.

Say if we have a method that takes an NSString object as its parameter and does something with the NSString object,

- (void)someMethod:(NSString *)str
{
    //do something with str
}

Consider this code

[someObject someMethod:[[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"Hello World!"]];

Since alloc has been used in creating the string as parameter of someMethod, it has to be balanced by release no matter explicitly in pre-ARC environment or implicitly under ARC. But it seems there is no way we can get a pointer to the string as we have never assigned it to any pointer.

So my question is, first, is this way of passing parameter prohibited in writing objective c code? If no, then how objects created this way get released? And finally, does this code lead to memory leak?


Just for the record, I understand the above code is written

NSString *string = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"Hello World!"];
[someObject someMethod:string];
// [string release]; depending on ARC or non-ARC
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well, in fact, that object is assigned to the variable named str, which is a parameter of your method. You can manage the memory inside your method via that pointer, although methods aren't supposed to take ownership of their arguments (except see below).

ARC knows what to do in this situation -- it will either autorelease the object or add a release once the method is finished.

Under MRR, your snippet would be a leak; the correct way to avoid that is also to send autorelease:

[someObject someMethod:[[[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"Hello World!"] autorelease]];

or to use your last snippet (putting the string into a temporary variable and releasing later).

As a slightly esoteric option, it is possible for your method to declare that it owns the argument, by using the ns_consumed attribute:

- (void)someMethod:(NSString *) __attribute__((ns_consumed)) str;

This indicates that your method should send release to the object before it returns -- ARC will also take care of that.

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ARC knows what to do in this situation -- it will either autorelease the object or add a release once the method is finished.If ARC is autoreleasing the object, is it inserting autorelease like you wrote for me, I mean, implicitly during compiling? Or there is no way to find out how ARC exactly handles this? To me ARC doing the "add a release once the method is finished" is highly unlikely cause how would it know my method needs a [str release]; at the end. –  Newbie indeed Jun 28 '13 at 21:05
    
Using the autorelease pool means that the object sticks around longer than it might otherwise need to. ARC will use release rather than autorelease whenever it can guarantee that the object will no longer be needed -- it knows the Cocoa memory management rules. In this case, I believe it's most likely to use a temp variable and a release after the method call. You can sort of see what ARC is doing, by looking at the generated assembler code -- it has a set of functions that you'll see. It's not possible to get the ObjC code after applying ARC, though. –  Josh Caswell Jun 28 '13 at 21:18
    
Got no idea what assembler code means. But thank you indeed for sharing your insight which made perfect sense to me. –  Newbie indeed Jun 28 '13 at 21:27
    
Assembler is the last (vaguely) human-readable step before machine code. It's what the compiler creates from your code files. You can view it in Xcode by going to the Build Menu and selecting Generate Output > Assembly File –  Josh Caswell Jun 28 '13 at 21:31
    
Sorry for the confusion. I know what assembler is. What I meant was I couldn't read it. Thanks for the instructions though. –  Newbie indeed Jun 28 '13 at 21:37

So my question is, first, is this way of passing parameter prohibited in writing objective c code?

No. It's perfectly legal.

If no, then how objects created this way get released?

ARC will take care of it for you. If you do your own reference counting, then you can add it to the autorelease pool before it goes out of scope:

[someObject someMethod:
  [[[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"Hello World!"] autorelease]];
                                                     ^^^^^^^^^^^

And finally, does this code lead to memory leak?

Not in ARC. In MRC, you would need to add the -autorelease.

The static analyzer would also point out that leak.

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There's no reason to not write code as you ask for consideration on… nothing prohibited in the slightest. These objects get released in the same manner that any other object gets released. Your lack of a variable to store the pointer in at the top level isn't important because the Objective C runtime knows about the object.

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But how do you counter the 'alloc' with a 'release' message to the object, assuming non-ARC? –  Newbie indeed Jun 28 '13 at 20:39

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