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I wonder if it would be possible to 'avoid' null checks in Java, take an example from this code:

@Override
public List<AccountBean> search(AccountConstraint... c) {
    if (c.length == 0) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("dao.AccountDAO.search: c.length == 0");
    }
    try {
        List<AccountBean> beans = new ArrayList<>();
        for (AccountConstraint ac : c) {
            Builder builder = new QueryBuilder.Builder("SELECT * FROM accounts");
            if (ac.getAccountId() != null) {
                builder.clause("accountId >= " + ac.getAccountId().getMin() + " AND accountId <= " + ac.getAccountId().getMax());
            }
            if (ac.getUsername() != null) {
                builder.clause("username = \"" + ac.getUsername() + "\"");
            }
            if (ac.getPassword() != null) {
                builder.clause("password = \"" + ac.getPassword() + "\"");
            }
            if (ac.getEmail() != null) {
                builder.clause("email = \"" + ac.getEmail() + "\"");
            }
            PreparedStatement ps = connection.prepareStatement(builder.build().getQuery());
            ResultSet rs = ps.executeQuery();
            while (rs.next()) {
                beans.add(new AccountBean(rs));
            }
        }
        return beans;
    } catch (SQLException ex) {
        throw new RuntimeException(ex);
    }
}

It has to check 4 times for the != null because else the code would fail.

Is it possible to turn the if (object != null) statements into one-liners that only execute if there is no NullPointerException? When there is an exception, the line should just be ignored.

I am not talking about a general language feature here, I am talking about a feature that would only be turned in when you explicitely decide to do so.

For example: NullCheck(builder.clause("username = \"" + ac.getUsername() + "\"")); would be a snippet of the suggested code.

Is something like that possible in Java?

Also if it is not possible, might it be possible in Java 8 to use methods (voids) directly in methods?

So then code like this could actually work?

public static NullCheck(Void void) {
    try {
        void.execute();
    }
    catch (NullPointerException e) {
        //ignore
    }
}

I know I could put the method inside it's own class that extends an interface that has method execute() and then pass that class around, but that would defeat the purpose of getting rid of the null checks or anything that would be even more complicated.

Regards.

WARNING: The way I used PreparedStatement here is prone to SQL Injection. Do not reuse this code.

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I have also wondered about this. I don't think that there is-- if you look at the big open source packages such as Oozie, they have a null class check or function. –  test Jun 28 '13 at 21:21
1  
i hope this method isn't used for user input (which it probably is) because it is a giant SQL injection attack waiting to happen. you should use the PreparedStatement correctly (using parameters, not hard coded values). –  jtahlborn Jun 28 '13 at 22:23
    
@jtahlborn Thanks for the heads up. I have indeed completely forgotten to use it properly, I have however used it properly in the inserting/deleting, so it is just a matter of forgetting it sadly. Again thanks. –  skiwi Jun 29 '13 at 11:39
    
Consider if this even is worth doing. What you gain in perceived elegance you lose in clarity. The basic reason why this looks ugly is the { } for a single statement if (it is a common misconception that they're required for good style). Without it the statement is simply if (ac.getEmail() != null) builder.clause("email = \"" + ac.getEmail() + "\""); which is as succinct and easier to understand than any "elegant" solution. –  Nuoji Jun 30 '13 at 11:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes and No.

There are two approaches to tackle the null problem:

Special Operators like the Safe Navigation Operator in Groovy. If x.y throws a NullPointerException x?.yreturns just null. Since Java does not allow creation of new operators, you can't do this in Java. Operators like this where considered for JDK8 but where dropped. If you want have something like this, switch to Groovy or one of the many other languages having this feature.

Special Class many languages have a special interface for representing a value that might be null. In Scala it is called Option. Option has two implementations: None + Some. None replaces null. Whenever you want to do something with the value, you don't use it directly, but you call map on the Option with a function as an argument. If it is actually a None, nothing happens, you just get back None. If it is a Some, the function gets executed on the value and you get an Option with the result. That way you can work with Options all the time, without worrying about nulls.

Actually it is in now way special, so you can create such a class yourself with Java. The problem is only, that Java doesn't have functions, so you have to use anonymous classes. This makes the whole thing really cumbersome and only a theoretical option.

JDK8 has a Option class. As far as I know it is missing the map method which makes the whole thing a bad joke in my opinion. But since the most important tool (anonymous functions) are there will be a proper Option implementation provided by one of the usual suspects (Google, Apache ...)

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You can avoid these checks by assuming that these methods do not return null values.

How can you assume this? By having the specification for the AccountConstraint say so. The code in AccountConstraint is then responsible for ensuring the values are not null, rather than your search method being responsible for handling null values. You might have to change the design of AccountConstraint to do this.

And what happens if your assumption is wrong? That is, if AccountConstraint is buggy. An exception will be thrown, which you were not expecting. But that is what can happen when you have a bug: an unexpected exception is thrown. Debugging the code will be easy, because the stacktrace will show you which method of AccountConstraint is returning an invalid null value.

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This assumption cannot be made as null values in AccountConstraint indicate that there is no constraint on that specific field. Also a friendly note, please revise your answer as the whole null thing is related to AccountConstraint and not to AccountBean. –  skiwi Jun 29 '13 at 11:42
    
@skiwi now amended. –  Raedwald Jul 1 '13 at 12:03

As it stands, you could probably write a method like

public void clauseIfNotNull(Builder builder, String format, Object o) {
  if (o != null) {
    builder.clause(String.format(format, o));
  }
}

and then that'd look like clauseIfNotNull(builder, "username = \"%s\"", ac.getUsername());

Other than that, there's not much you can do with Java 7.

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What about Java 8? Is anything specific known about that already? –  skiwi Jun 28 '13 at 21:21
    
Sure, you could write a method to say "just cancel if this throws a NullPointerException, and it'd even be decently readable with Java 8, though it wouldn't be as efficient. –  Louis Wasserman Jun 28 '13 at 21:23
2  
@skiwi I don't actually think that you'll be able to write something better in Java 8. I think this answer looks decent enough, I would do the same thing. –  Malcolm Jun 28 '13 at 22:23

Make a minimal adaptor object on the Builder

class NotNullClauseAdapter
{
   private final Builder builder;
   public NotNullClauseAdapter(Builder builder) {
      this.builder = builder;
   }
   public void clause(String format, Object o) {
      if (o != null) {
        builder.clause(String.format(format, o));
      }
   }
}

Use this in your code:

for (AccountConstraint ac : c) {
  Builder builder = new QueryBuilder.Builder("SELECT * FROM accounts");
  NotNullClauseAdapter adapter = new NotNullClauseAdapter(builder);
  if (ac.getAccountId() != null) {
      builder.clause("accountId >= " + ac.getAccountId().getMin() + " AND accountId <= " + ac.getAccountId().getMax());
  }
  adapter.clause("username = \"%s\"", ac.getUserName());
  adapter.clause("password = \"%s\"", ac.getPassword));
  adapter.clause("email = \"%s\"", ac.getEmail());
  PreparedStatement ps = connection.prepareStatement(builder.build().getQuery());
  ResultSet rs = ps.executeQuery();
  while (rs.next()) {
    beans.add(new AccountBean(rs));
  }
}

You can expand by adding further clause-methods to the adapter to handle specific objects like ranges in order to convert things like the accountId as well, e.g.

public void clauseMinMax(String format, Range r) {
  if (r != null) {
     builder.clause(String.format(format, r.getMin(), r.getMax()));
  }
}

The accountId row then becomes (if getAccountId() returns a Range object):

adapter.clauseMinMax("accountId >= %d AND accountId <= %d", ac.getAccountId());
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Use JSR305 and use the appropriate @Nonnull annotations and you don't have to do null checks, the annotations do them for you.

The use of @Nonnull and @CheckReturnValue annotations from JSR305 help to express the needs for null and return value checks. It is a good practice that the developer describes the expected behavior of the implementation for the later use and the static code analysis.

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