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I'm trying to build a function to determine if a query returns {null}. For some reason it always returns false. What am I doing wrong?

bool CC_Database::checkNullQuery(string query)
{
sqlite3_stmt *statement;
if(sqlite3_prepare_v2(database, query.c_str(), -1, &statement, 0) == SQLITE_NULL)
{
    cout << "null" << endl;
    return true;
} else {
    cout << "not null" << endl;
    return false;
}
}

Code used to call function

if (!db->checkNullQuery("SELECT MAX(Inventory_ID) FROM Inventory;")) {
    ...
}
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Does the code print out "not null"? –  0x499602D2 Jun 28 '13 at 22:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When your query is run on an empty set, it does not return {null}, but a result table with one column and one row that contains the NULL value. You have to fetch the value of that row to determine whether it is NULL.

(And you forgot to call sqlite3_finalize().)

Furthermore, you should not execute the query twice just to determine whether the result is empty or not. Your db.query function should just handle NULL values correctly.

The following is a function that expects a query that returns a single number (as your MAX query) or NULL:

int CC_Database::singleNumberQuery(const string& query, bool& resultIsValid)
{
    sqlite3_stmt *stmt;
    int result;

    resultIsValid = false;

    int rc = sqlite3_prepare_v2(database, query.c_str(), -1, &stmt, NULL);
    if (rc != SQLITE_OK) {
        printf("error: %s\n", sqlite3_errmsg(database));
        // or throw an exception
        return -1;
    }

    rc = sqlite3_step(stmt);
    if (rc != SQLITE_DONE && rc != SQLITE_ROW) {
        printf("error: %s\n", sqlite3_errmsg(database));
        // or throw an exception
        sqlite3_finalize(stmt);
        return -1;
    }

    if (rc == SQLITE_DONE) // no result
        result = -1;
    else if (sqlite3_column_type(stmt, 0) == SQLITE_NULL) // result is NULL
        result = -1;
    else { // some valid result
        result = sqlite3_column_int(stmt, 0);
        resultIsValid = true;
    }

    sqlite3_finalize(stmt);

    return result;
}

(If -1 cannot be a valid return value, you do not need the resultIsValid parameter.)

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Thanks, I am very new to C++ and SQlite. I got this working, but had to remove the resultIsValid to make it work could you give me an example of how to use this with the resultIsValid? Thanks –  Talon06 Jun 29 '13 at 16:00
    
That depends on what the caller of this function wants to do ... –  CL. Jun 29 '13 at 19:06

When an SQL statement is successfully-executed, sqlite3_prepare_v2 will return SQLITE_OK.

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Normally you would check for SQLITE_OK (as per the sqlite docs). If the response is not SQLITE_OK then you would call sqlite3_errmsg(database) to discover the error.

Obviously if you have no error then you can proceed to step through the resulting rows from your query with sqlite3_step(statement)

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I tried SQLITE_OK first and since there are no errors it always reports successful as well the issue I am running into is an error that crashes my program when the query returns null and the results are sent to a vector. Example vector<vector<string> > resultMax = db->query("SELECT MAX(Inventory_ID) FROM Inventory;"); –  Talon06 Jun 29 '13 at 6:32

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