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I am in the process of refactoring a legacy application. The application in question uses a SQL Server database table to queue jobs that get retrieved and processed by one or more Windows services. I want to create an iterator that pulls the next queued job with a "Waiting" status for processing while maintaining the proper locks. A sample unit test is included below. My question is whether there are any potential showstoppers with my approach.

// Database DDL

if object_id('Jobs') is not null begin
   drop table Jobs;
end
go
create table Jobs
(
    Id int identity(1,1) not null primary key clustered
,   JobStatus varchar(50) not null
);

insert Jobs
select 'Waiting'
union all
select 'Waiting'
union all
select 'Processing'
union all
select 'Completed'
union all
select 'Failed';

// Unit Test

// Data Model
public sealed class Job
{
    public readonly int JobId;

    public Job(int jobId)
    {
        JobId = jobId;
    }
}

[TestFixture]
public class JobsTest
{
    private const string connectionString = 
        "Data Source=.;Initial Catalog=<databasename>;Integrated Security=True;Connect Timeout=15;Encrypt=False;TrustServerCertificate=False";

    const string SQL =
        @"declare @jobId table(JobId int)
          update  top(1) Jobs
          set     JobStatus = 'Processing'
          output  Inserted.Id into @jobId
          where   JobStatus = 'Waiting'
          select  JobId from @jobId;";

    [Test]
    public void CanIterateJobs()
    {
        foreach (var job in Jobs)
        {
            Assert.NotNull(job, "job was null.");
            Console.WriteLine(job.JobId);
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<Job> Jobs
    {
        get
        {
            while (true)
            {
                Job job = null;
                do
                {
                    using (var connection = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
                    {
                        using (var command = new SqlCommand(SQL, connection))
                        {
                            connection.Open();
                            var reader = command.ExecuteReader();
                            if (reader.Read())
                            {
                                job = new Job(Convert.ToInt32(reader["JobId"]));
                                yield return job;
                            }
                        }
                    }

                } while (job == null);

                Task.Delay(1000);
            }
        }
    } 
}
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closed as off-topic by Simon Halsey, gunr2171, JB., Alexander Galkin, Mr Lister Dec 24 '13 at 7:21

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3  
The call to Task.Delay in there does nothing. The call itself just starts a task that will be completed in a second; it doesn't block the thread for a second, you'd need Thread.Sleep for that. –  Servy Jun 28 '13 at 23:29
2  
When you yield your next job you're done with the given command/connection, but you don't actually dispose of either until the next one is requested. This means you're holding onto those resources for the entire time that the caller is processing a given item. You can easily fix this by moving the yield to after the end of the end of the do/while. Note that this wouldn't affect correctness of the program, just help more efficiently utilize system resources. –  Servy Jun 28 '13 at 23:31
1  
@RedPolygon Honestly, I'm not sure what it's doing there. Perhaps it's just there for debugging purposes to represent real work, I don't know. In any case, it's a useless operation and should probably just be removed. –  Servy Jun 28 '13 at 23:33
3  
code review question -> move . –  usr Dec 1 '13 at 13:56
4  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is a code review –  Simon Halsey Dec 24 '13 at 3:40