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I have these following codes set up-

class ID3{
    const char* fileName;
    TagLib::FileRef *file;

public:
    ID3(const char *);
    QImage* artwork();
}

ID3::ID3(const char* fileNameStr){
    this->fileName = fileNameStr;
    this->file = new TagLib::FileRef(fileNameStr);
    qDebug()<<fileNameStr;                                   //OUTPUT 2
}

QImage* ID3::artwork(){
    QString str = QString::fromLocal8Bit(this->fileName);
    qDebug()<<str;                                           //OUTPUT 3
    //MORE CODES-------
}

const char * QstrTocChar(QString str){
    QByteArray ba = str.toLocal8Bit();
    qDebug()<<ba.constData();                                //OUTPUT 1
    return ba.constData();
}


int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
             .
             .
             .
    QString fileName = "C:/Qt/Qt5.0.2/Projects/taglib_test/music files/Muse_-_Madness.mp3";

    file = new ID3(QstrTocChar(fileName));
    QImage *image = file->artwork();
}

Now when I run the program, I get these strange outputs

OUTPUT 1

C:/Qt/Qt5.0.2/Projects/taglib_test/music files/Muse_-_Madness.mp3 

OUTPUT 2

????p???e'2/ 

OUTPUT 3

"°í³àpµ˜Æe'2/" 

Not sure about OUTPUT 2 but I expect OUTPUT 3 to be same as OUTPUT 1. I am a Qt newbie. Would really appreciate advice/help in understanding, these strange character encoding issues and how to get OUTPUT 3 fixed.

Thanks!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

ba.constantData() is returning a pointer to data which will be invalid when QstrToChar finishes executing (the 8-bit converted QByteArray), when QstrToChar completes, all you have left is free'd junk.

What if you just did:

file = new ID3(fileName.toLocal8Bit().constData());

in your main routine?

Actually, you still probably need to keep your own copy of this data in your private ID3 char *, since it can go away with the destruction of these temporaries.

Your code should be this, instead:

class ID3{
    std::string fileName;
    std::smart_ptr<TagLib::FileRef> file;

public:
    ID3(std::string);
    QImage* artwork();
}

ID3::ID3(std::string fileNameStr) {
    this->fileName = fileNameStr;
    this->file.reset(new TagLib::FileRef(fileNameStr));
    qDebug()<<fileNameStr;                                   //OUTPUT 2
}

QImage* ID3::artwork(){
    QString str = QString::fromLocal8Bit(this->fileName);
    qDebug()<<str;                                           //OUTPUT 3
    //MORE CODES-------
}

std::string QstrToCppString(QString str){
    QByteArray ba = str.toLocal8Bit();
    qDebug()<<ba.constData();                                //OUTPUT 1
    return std::string(ba.constData());
}


int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
             .
             .
             .
    QString fileName = "C:/Qt/Qt5.0.2/Projects/taglib_test/music files/Muse_-_Madness.mp3";

    file = new ID3(QstrToCppString(fileName));
    QImage *image = file->artwork();
}

Notice that I've wrapped your TagLib::FileRef in a smart_ptr as well, since you are new-ing it, you'll need to manage the memory. An alternative would be to write a proper destructor for your ID3 class. You're definitely leaking these currently (unless you just didn't share your destructor code).

share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense! I've never came across smart_ptr. Guess it's not there in Qt. I am editing my code as per your suggestion. Thank you :) –  Killswitch Jun 28 '13 at 23:52
1  
smart_ptr is a part of the C++ standard library for a while not, it is not a Qt thing, so unless you're using an ancient compiler, you should be able to use it without trouble. If you do run into trouble, boost will give you a smart_ptr you can use. –  crowder Jun 28 '13 at 23:53
1  
For the record, Qt has a complete implementation of all different kinds of smart pointer classes. –  Chris Jun 29 '13 at 0:05
    
@crowder - That worked like charm! Been working on it since the last 3/4 hours, tried a lot of things neither of which worked. You are a life-saver! Thank you so much :) PS- Couldn't find std::smart_ptr in my compiler. I'll look into what Chris just suggested. –  Killswitch Jun 29 '13 at 0:12

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