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Im trying to use dwarf to compare two c++ files, but I am running into issues when I get to local variables in non-member functions. Consider the following code -

int f(){
    [static] int j=0;
    return j;
}

If I compile it without the static modifier I get the following dwarf info -

 <1><eb>: Abbrev Number: 13 (DW_TAG_subprogram)
    <ec>   DW_AT_external    : 1
    <ed>   DW_AT_name        : f
    <ef>   DW_AT_decl_file   : 1
    <f0>   DW_AT_decl_line   : 15
    <f1>   DW_AT_MIPS_linkage_name: (indirect string, offset: 0x22): _Z1fv
    <f5>   DW_AT_type        : <0xa8>
    <f9>   DW_AT_low_pc      : 0x0
    <101>   DW_AT_high_pc     : 0x10
    <109>   DW_AT_frame_base  : 0x0     (location list)
    <10d>   DW_AT_sibling     : <0x130>
 <2><111>: Abbrev Number: 14 (DW_TAG_lexical_block)
    <112>   DW_AT_low_pc      : 0x4
    <11a>   DW_AT_high_pc     : 0xe
 <3><122>: Abbrev Number: 15 (DW_TAG_variable)
    <123>   DW_AT_name        : j
    <125>   DW_AT_decl_file   : 1
    <126>   DW_AT_decl_line   : 16
    <127>   DW_AT_type        : <0xa8>
    <12b>   DW_AT_location    : 2 byte block: 91 6c     (DW_OP_fbreg: -20)

but if I compile it with the static modifier I get -

 <1><eb>: Abbrev Number: 13 (DW_TAG_subprogram)
    <ec>   DW_AT_external    : 1
    <ed>   DW_AT_name        : f
    <ef>   DW_AT_decl_file   : 1
    <f0>   DW_AT_decl_line   : 22
    <f1>   DW_AT_MIPS_linkage_name: (indirect string, offset: 0x24): _Z1fv
    <f5>   DW_AT_type        : <0xa8>
    <f9>   DW_AT_low_pc      : 0x0
    <101>   DW_AT_high_pc     : 0xc
    <109>   DW_AT_frame_base  : 0x0     (location list)
    <10d>   DW_AT_sibling     : <0x137>
 <2><111>: Abbrev Number: 14 (DW_TAG_lexical_block)
    <112>   DW_AT_low_pc      : 0x4
    <11a>   DW_AT_high_pc     : 0xa
 <3><122>: Abbrev Number: 15 (DW_TAG_variable)
    <123>   DW_AT_name        : j
    <125>   DW_AT_decl_file   : 1
    <126>   DW_AT_decl_line   : 23
    <127>   DW_AT_type        : <0xa8>
    <12b>   DW_AT_location    : 9 byte block: 3 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0        (DW_OP_addr: 20)

Now as far as I can tell, there is only one real difference between these file - the byte block size on the DW_AT_location attributes for variable j is different (this is why the DW_AT_sibling attributes in function f's tag are different, so I don't count that). I presume this somehow implies static, but I dont know how.

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2 Answers

DWARF doesn't try to describe the linkage of a variable, only it's type, it's scope, and how to locate it. And by "scope", I mean when code can see/access the value which means only within the body of f(), even if it is static.

fbreg is the register that is the base of your stack frame -- most commonly on x86_64, rbp. Local variables are contained on the stack within the function's stack frame (again on x86_64, usually between the rbp and rsp). The stack grows downward so rbp has a higher value than rsp.

As far as the DW_AT_location for your static showing a value of 20, I'm guessing you dumped the DWARF of a .o file before it had been linked in to an executable. When this is linked to a final executable, I'd expect the linker to update that DW_AT_location with the actual address of the static - right now I'm betting it's just a relocation placeholder.

Usually debuggers use the symbol names in the executable itself to augment their global/static variables list because users may want to examine f's j variable even if f() is out of scope. The static's name will be mangled (not necessarily in the C++ sense of mangling) in some way (otherwise another function g() which also had a static j would conflict) so the debugger needs to know how to handle that.

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+1 for cleverly figuring out I hadn't linked yet! –  Dgrin91 Jun 29 '13 at 15:39
    
So I suppose what you are saying is that I cant really figure it out without either fully linking and looking at the exe or by analyzing the stack? –  Dgrin91 Jun 29 '13 at 15:51
    
Yeah, you could look at the DW_AT_location and see if it's an absolute address or not. In the case of C++, the name mangling tells you what's going on. See 5.1.6 "Scope Encoding" refspecs.linux-foundation.org/cxxabi-1.83.html#mangling-scope - in the case of f() with g, the mangled name is _ZZ1fvE1j. You can see the <descriminator> bit come in to effect if you have f() { static int j = 5; { static int j = 10; } }' - the second one will have a mangled name like _ZZ1fvE1j1`. Note that plain C uses a mangling scheme as well; clang on Mac OS X happens to mangle to _f.j. –  Jason Molenda Jun 29 '13 at 19:58
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I'm no expert on "DWARF", but I see a very distinct difference between these lines:

<12b>   DW_AT_location    : 2 byte block: 91 6c     (DW_OP_fbreg: -20)

<12b>   DW_AT_location    : 9 byte block: 3 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0        (DW_OP_addr: 20)

One of the is fbreg: -20 - so "frame buffer regeister, offset -20".

The other, I presume referring to an absolute address (32 bytes into the DATA segment, perhaps?)

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Yes, but from my understand of dwarf (which could very well be wrong) fbreg is not unique to static in this scenario. So how could I determine staticness of a variable based on this? Clearly there must be some way as the compiler is able to distinguish, but how? –  Dgrin91 Jun 29 '13 at 0:56
    
DWARF describes the debugging information, and tells the debugger how to retrieve variable's information in which memory space. It doesn't an annotation for code, so [non]static is meaningless for DWARF. Compiler is able to distinguish the difference of auto/static variables. However, after code-generation, it does not have to tell the difference. In compiler techniques, auto variables are always allocated in stack, so different method call has different frame. For static variables, it must be an fixed and allocated memory address and every method call can see the same one. –  jclin Jul 29 '13 at 9:09
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