Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to project a file into memory to operate with it. The file contais structs so I'm trying to use a pointer to the start of one struct and then read it and modify some variable. The problem is that the time of execution is high and I suppose that using mmap the time will be less. This is the code, any suggestion?

#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>

int revisanotas(int fd)
{
int nbytes=1;
int nbytese=0;
int i=0;
int n=0;
struct stat datos;
fstat(fd, &datos);
evaluacion buf;
evaluacion* buffer=mmap(0,datos.st_size, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE, fd, 0);
int actual = read(fd,buffer,datos.st_size);
{
i++;
if (buffer[i].notamedia >= 4.5 && buffer[i].notamedia < 5)
{
n=n+1;
printf("Notamedia = %f\n",buffer[i].notamedia);

buffer[i].notamedia=5;
}

}while (i<(datos.st_size/(sizeof(evaluacion))));
return
share|improve this question
    
Are you missing a do after the call to read? –  D.Shawley Nov 15 '09 at 14:12
add comment

5 Answers 5

Well, first, please tell us what evaluacion is defined as, and put the do in there that matches the while; I'm assuming it's right after the "int actual" line.

Second, it looks like you might be calling mmap() more often than needed; how often is revisanotas() called with the same fd? The mmap call itself is slow, like malloc; the speed is when you use the mapped file, in this case, the data pointed to by buffer.

Third, compute datos.st_size/(sizeof(evaluacion)) once outside the loop and change the while clause to compare to that. The current code looks like it performs the divide once per iteration through the loop, and divides are slow.

See if that helps any.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The call to read() is unnecessary. Mmap() maps the file contents into memory for you - that is why it is generally faster than reading the entire file using read(). You should be able to remove the call to read() altogether. There are some other problems with your code though.

If you want to modifications to actually be reflected in the disk file, then you should call msync(buffer, dataos.st_size, MS_SYNC). When you are done, call munmap(buffer, dataos.st_size) to release the shared memory segment. Think of msync() as the shared memory equivalent to fflush() and munmap() is similar to close(). The key difference between munmap() and close() is that the former does not flush buffers or synchronize to disk so you have to do it yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, I removed the read() and the time decreases dramatically :). Now, I'm trying to figure out how to use msync, because what I have to do is modify the notamedia variable in each structure that matches the condition and then write in the disk the whole file modified. –  Peter Nov 15 '09 at 14:52
    
After you finish modifying all of the values, call msync() on the entire data segment. If the changes to each structure need to be visible during the modification, then call msync(&buffer[i], sizeof(buffer[i]), MS_SYNC) after you do the modification. I'm not sure if you can safely due the latter though since the individual buffer elements are probably not page aligned. Better to do the whole segment at one time after the loop is done. –  D.Shawley Nov 15 '09 at 15:04
    
This is wrong. There is no requirement to use msync for the changes to be reflected in the file. –  R.. Sep 28 '11 at 0:04
add comment

Thanks mike for the answer, the struct is something like this and it's defined in a header file:

struct evaluacion 
{ char id[16]; 
 char apellido1[32]; 
char apellido2[32]; 
char name[32]; float nota1p; 
float nota2p; 
float notamedia; 
char photofilename[20]; 
int photosize; 
char photodata[16000]; 
};

There's only one fd, only one file open, but many structs inside

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm making some progress I think, but seems I'm not modifying the file. If I run the program once, it detects 32 variables modified, but If I run twice still the same, when the It's supposed to be modified :(

The execution time now is not bad I think

int revisanotas(int fd)
{
int i=0;
int n=0;
struct stat datos;
fstat(fd, &datos);
int num=datos.st_size/(sizeof(evaluacion));
evaluacion buf;
evaluacion* buffer=mmap(0,datos.st_size, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE, fd, 0);
do
{
i++;
if (buffer[i].notamedia >= 4.5 && buffer[i].notamedia < 5)
{
n=n+1;

buffer[i].notamedia=5;
}
msync(&buffer[i],sizeof(buffer[i]),MS_SYNC);
}while (i<(num));
munmap(buffer,datos.st_size);
return(n);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Check the return value of msync. My guess is that it is failing, returning -1, and setting errno to EINVAL (22). Try calling msync(buffer, dataos.st_size, MS_SYNC) before calling munmap. –  D.Shawley Nov 15 '09 at 15:25
    
I did: int r=msync(buffer,datos,st_size,MS_SYNC); mmunmap(buffer,datos.st_size), Seems that msync is returning 0 Correctme if I'm wrong, but do I have to do something to overwrite the original file described by the 'fd'? or once I release the memory and write with msync will be written in the file? –  Peter Nov 15 '09 at 15:51
add comment

I think now is working :), the code is as follows. Please comment if you see something wrong:

int revisanotas(int fd)
{
int i=0;
int n=0;
struct stat datos;
fstat(fd, &datos);
int num=datos.st_size/(sizeof(evaluacion));

evaluacion* buffer=mmap(0,datos.st_size, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE, MAP_SHARED, fd, 0);
do
{
i++;
if (buffer[i].notamedia >= 4.5 && buffer[i].notamedia < 5)
{
n=n+1;
buffer[i].notamedia=5;
}

}while (i<(num));
int r=munmap(&buffer[0],datos.st_size);

return(n);
}

Thanks everybody for the help.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.