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In some apple documentation i've seen, they suggest using a macro to check for the current version of iOS installed which could be used across your project. It looks something like this:

NSUInteger MajorVersionInstalled();
NSUInteger MajorVersionInstalled() {
   // Call objective-c methods and return NSUInteger
}

#define IS_OLDER_THAN_SIX (MajorVersionInstalled() < 6)

And the idea is that you can use the macro in conditional checks across your project. I'd like to use this idea, but i'm getting a bit confused because its using a c function and i'm not sure where to define it:

  • Is there a place I should use to define this for use across my project (Prefix.pch ??).
  • Does the function implementation go in the same place??
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1 Answer 1

Is there a place I should use to define this for use across my project (Prefix.pch ??).

The PCH is not a good place. It's better to put in a separate header and #import where you need it because it is likely that this declaration need not be visible everywhere. Note: The implication by using NSUInteger is also that the function is only usable in objc sources.

Does the function implementation go in the same place??

Unless you have a very specific need, the declaration:

 NSUInteger MajorVersionInstalled();

belongs in a header file and the definition:

 NSUInteger MajorVersionInstalled() {
    // Call objective-c methods and return NSUInteger
 }

belongs in an *.m file.

Once you do that, you could also create a function to get rid of #define IS_OLDER_THAN_SIX (MajorVersionInstalled() < 6).

Using the pch, definitions in the header, and foundation everywhere will often slow down your builds and can create larger binaries. It's difficult to detect this in small projects, but quickly becomes an issue in larger bodies of code and libraries.

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