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I'm making a Pixel-Cheat for a game. The program only works for 64bit currently and I'm trying to compile for 32bit.

I tried many ways of finding base address of process, but to no avail. Only the 64bit function works, and it will create a 64bit program.

Here's my 64bit working function:

DWORD64 GetModuleBase(HANDLE hProc, string &sModuleName) 
{ 
  HMODULE *hModules; 
  char szBuf[50]; 
  DWORD cModules; 
  DWORD64 dwBase = -1; 
  //------ 

  EnumProcessModulesEx(hProc, hModules, 0, &cModules, LIST_MODULES_ALL); 
  hModules = new HMODULE[cModules/sizeof(HMODULE)]; 

  if(EnumProcessModulesEx(hProc, hModules, 
      cModules/sizeof(HMODULE), &cModules,     LIST_MODULES_ALL)) { 
  for(int i = 0; i < cModules/sizeof(HMODULE); i++) { 
     if(GetModuleBaseName(hProc, hModules[i], szBuf, sizeof(szBuf))) { 
        if(sModuleName.compare(szBuf) == 0) { 
           dwBase = (DWORD64)hModules[i]; 
           break; 
           } 
        } 
     } 
  } 

  delete[] hModules; 

  return dwBase; 
}

All 32bit functions on google fails, with error:

21 59 C:\Users\Administrator\Documents\main.cpp [Error] cast from 'BYTE* {aka unsigned char*}' to 'DWORD {aka long unsigned int}' loses precision [-fpermissive]

How to get this code work in 32bit?

share|improve this question
    
"All 32bit functions on google fails, with error" - very unclear what this means. Your code currently explicitly uses DWORD64 which unlikely to compile on 32 bit the way you imagine... –  Alexei Levenkov Jun 29 '13 at 2:12
    
Consider checking Windows Data Types article to know what each define refers to on each platform. –  Alexei Levenkov Jun 29 '13 at 2:15
    
"All 32bit functions on google fails, with error" simplified: "All 32bit functions that gets base address on a 32bit target taken from the site google is failing, on a 64 bit system, with error". I need the code (not to only work on my 64bit) but both 32bit and 64bit. –  Marcus Jun 29 '13 at 2:46
    
GetModuleHandleEx does exactly what your function is trying to do. (If you use the HMODULE itself as an address) –  asveikau Jun 29 '13 at 2:56
    
What does 'taken from the site google' have to do with it? –  EJP Jun 29 '13 at 3:24
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted
DWORD64 GetModuleBase(HANDLE hProc, string &sModuleName) 
{ 
  HMODULE *hModules;
  char szBuf[50]; 
  DWORD cModules; 
  DWORD64 dwBase = -1; 
  //------ 

  EnumProcessModulesEx(hProc, NULL, 0, &cModules, LIST_MODULES_ALL); 
  hModules = new HMODULE[cModules/sizeof(HMODULE)]; 

  if(EnumProcessModulesEx(hProc, hModules, 
      cModules/sizeof(HMODULE), &cModules,     LIST_MODULES_ALL)) { 
  for(unsigned int i = 0; i < cModules/sizeof(HMODULE); i++) { 
     if(GetModuleBaseName(hProc, hModules[i], szBuf, sizeof(szBuf))) { 
        if(sModuleName.compare(szBuf) == 0) { 
           dwBase = (DWORD64)hModules[i]; 
           break; 
           } 
        } 
     } 
  } 

  delete[] hModules; 

  return dwBase; 
}

Your function as it stood compiled just fine in a 32bit exe on my machine with a few warnings which I corrected in the snippet above.

A few things you may want to do, is make sure your compiler is set to run in Multi-Byte Character Mode, and not Unicode if you're going to pass an 8bit char array(szBuf) to the function, otherwise use a 16bit wchar array. Also you passed hModules to EnumProcessModulesEx() on the first call which was where you were to get the number of modules, that would have generated an error since it has not yet been allocated, pass NULL on the first call to get the number of modules, then pass hModules.

Alas, the code should compile and run fine, but next time use GetModuleHandle() as mentioned before, will save you a headache.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I will try compile it in virtualbox 32bit, to make sure it gets 32bit. Thanks for serious answer. –  Marcus Jun 29 '13 at 6:06
    
You're welcome. Hope all goes well. –  David Otano Jun 29 '13 at 6:10
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