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I have got a string "Bullet weapons do less damage against armor." and there is condition this string has to split into parts based on the parameter int width=20 in different ways.

1.wraps text given a specific width.

"Bullet weapons do less damage against armor." becomes

"Bullet weapons do le"
"ss damage against ar"
"mor."
  1. wraps text given a specific width, but words are not split unless absolutely necessary.

    "Bullet weapons do less damage against armor." becomes

    "Bullet weapons do " "less damage against " "armor."

3.wraps text given a specific width, words are not split unless absolutely necessary. When wrapping, this function will attempt to make lines as even as possible in terms of width.

"Bullet weapons do less damage against armor." becomes

"Bullet weapons "
"do less damage "
"against armor."

for the case 1: i wrote logic as follows:

     int len=text.length();   where text is string text= "Bullet weapons do less damage     against armor."

int last=0,first=0;

    vector<string> output;



int max=ceil((double)len/width);
cout<<max<<endl;



for(int i=0;i<max;i++)
{

    first=width*i;
    if(len<(width+(width*i)))
    {
        last=len;
    }
    else
    {
        last=width+(width*i);
    }


    string s(text,first,last);
    output.push_back(s);


}

but it is giving me results as :

Bullet weapons do le ss damage against armor. mor. where in second line it should up to " ss damage against ar" where is wrong in logic;

how about case (2) and (3).

Please help me out

Thanks

share|improve this question

The third parameter of the constructor is the length of the string to be constructed, not the offset of the last character.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot but how about case 2 and 3 – Srinivas Jun 29 '13 at 3:32
    
@user2533835 You didn't ask any questions about case 2 and 3. – David Schwartz Jun 29 '13 at 4:35
  1. You should change

    string s(text,first,last); --> string s(text,first,width);
    
  2. You should consider split string in to words, then add those words to another string with its length checked.

    int i = -1;
    string word = "";
    string part = "";
    do
    {
        i = text.find(' ');
        if (i != -1)
        {
            word = text.substr(0, i);
            text = text.substr(i + 1);
            if (word.length() + part.length() < width)
            {
                part += " " + word;
            }
            else
            {
                output.push_back(part);
                cout << part << endl;
                part = word;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            word = text;
            if (word.length() + part.length() < width)
            {
                part += " " + word;
                output.push_back(part);
                cout << part << endl;
            }
            else
            {
                output.push_back(part);
                cout << part << endl;
                output.push_back(word);
                cout << word << endl;
            }
        }
    } while (i != -1);
    
  3. You should re-calculate the width before do something similar to case 2

share|improve this answer
    
error C2678: binary '=' : no operator found which takes a left-hand operand of type 'const std::string' (or there is no acceptable conversion) – Srinivas Jun 29 '13 at 7:23
    
@user2533835 did you declare text with const? – DzungAh Jun 30 '13 at 16:23

Case 1: As others have already pointed out, the string constructor in your example is slightly wrong, and the line should be:

string s(text,first,width);

Case 2: I would suggest starting with a substring equal to the maximum allowed width, then searching backwards for whitespace, like this:

while (!text.empty())
{
    // Search backwards for a space. If we don't find one, break at the
    // maximum width.
    size_t line_width = text.rfind(' ', width - 1);
    if (line_width == string::npos)
    {
        line_width = width;
    }

    string current_line(text, 0, line_width);
    text = text.substr(line_width + 1);

    cout << current_line << endl;
}

Case 3: For this, it seems like you need to somehow figure out what width gives you the lines with the most regular length. There are probably several ways to do this, but the solution that comes to my mind is to run the algorithm several times, decreasing the width each time, and each time tracking how much shorter each line is than that width (call this the "width difference"). The solution is then the set of lines with the smallest total width difference.

vector<string> best_line_set;
size_t best_total_width_difference = std::numeric_limits<size_t>::max();

for (j = width; j > 4; --j)
{
    string original_text(text);

    vector<string> current_line_set;
    size_t current_total_width_difference = 0;

    while (!text.empty())
    {
        // Search backwards for a space. If we don't find one, break at the
        // maximum width.
        size_t line_width = text.rfind(' ', j - 1);
        if (line_width == string::npos)
        {
            line_width = j;

            string current_line(text, 0, line_width);
            text = (line_width < text.size())
                ? text.substr(line_width)
                : "";

            current_line_set.push_back(current_line);
        }
        else
        {
            current_total_width_difference += j - line_width;

            string current_line(text, 0, line_width);
            text = (line_width + 1  < text.size())
                ? text.substr(line_width + 1)
                : "";

            current_line_set.push_back(current_line);
        }
    }

    if (current_total_width_difference < best_total_width_difference)
    {
        best_line_set = current_line_set;
        best_total_width_difference = current_total_width_difference;
    }

    text = original_text;
}

Notice I chose a minimum value of 5 for j - if the minimum value is 1, it almost always wins, because it always has a total width difference of 0. You might also consider including some kind of "good enough" threshold on the sum so that you don't run through the loop several more times to improve on a solution that is already "good enough".

share|improve this answer
    
text = text.substr(line_width + 1); is giving and saying operator "= " matches these operanads – Srinivas Jun 29 '13 at 6:57
    
error C2678: binary '=' : no operator found which takes a left-hand operand of type 'const std::string' (or there is no acceptable conversion) – Srinivas Jun 29 '13 at 7:22
    
It sounds like your version of text is declared const - you should be able to avoid this error by creating a new string like string text_copy(text); and using it instead of text itself. I also discovered a bug in my original solution and have edited it to fix it. – Ben S. Jun 29 '13 at 7:43

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