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I have a large xml file with a bunch of database table definitions that look like this:

table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>

I would like to replace the end bracket in each matching line (not all lines start with table name="") so that the original line is retained, but slonyId="number" is appended before the >. To make things a bit more complex, I'd like the slonyId number to be incremented, starting at 0, so that if I have 1000 table definitions, the first one looks like:

table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="0">

And the last one looks like:

table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyId="999">

What is the best approach to this problem?

Thanks in advance!

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How are you recognizing the line if table name= ins't guaranteed to be there? Is the only identifying feature >? –  FDinoff Jun 29 '13 at 3:45
    
each line I care about starts with "table name=" There are many other lines in the file, but some start with "index name" or something else. I don't need to modify these lines –  user2533865 Jun 29 '13 at 3:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Adding solution from JS:

awk -F'>' '/table name/{$NF="slonyid="q x++ q FS}1' q='"' inputFile

Try this:

awk -F'>' '/table name/{print $(NF-1)" slonyid""=""\""NR-1"\""">"}' inputFile

Adding test:

$ cat temp.txt
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>


$ awk -F'>' '/table name/{print $(NF-1)" slonyid""=""\""NR-1"\""">"}' temp.txt
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="0">
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="1">
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="2">
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="3">
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="4">
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="5">
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="6">
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="7">
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="8">
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="9">
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="10">
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="11">
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="12">
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="13">
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here slonyid="14">
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I don't entirely understand this command, and I'm not sure how it works. I think -F identifies > as a field separator. Could you elaborate? The fact that I don't see "slonyID=" anywhere in your solution makes me think that your solution won't solve my problem. Thanks! –  user2533865 Jun 29 '13 at 3:52
    
@user2533865 I have added a test, hope that helps. –  Amit Jun 29 '13 at 3:57
    
oh, wow. That's genius! Thank you! –  user2533865 Jun 29 '13 at 3:57
    
@user2533865: You're welcome. Please do remember to accept the answer if it has helped you solve your problem :) –  Amit Jun 29 '13 at 3:59
1  
@Amit Couple of suggestions. Using NR for lines that may not appear on every line is not useful. Using a variable will help. Also, there are too many quotes. You can create a variable and call it inside your awk script. Something like: awk -F'>' '/table name/{$NF="slonyid="q x++ q FS}1' q='"' xmlfile. Using a variable will ensure that it gets incremented in order even if lines appear periodically. One more thing, we need to add regex so it only affects lines with table names and not all lines. –  jaypal singh Jun 29 '13 at 4:14

Code for GNU :

sed = file|sed 'N;s/\n/\t/;/\S\+\s\+table name/!d'|sed =|sed 'N;s/\n/\t/;s/\(\S\+\)\s\+\([^>]\+\)>/\2 slonyid="\1">/;s#\(\S\+\)\s\+\(.*\)#\1 s/.*/\2/#'|sed -f - file

Pure sed solution with 4 pipes.

$cat file
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text AAA here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text XXX here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text YYY here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text ZZZ here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text BBB here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text XXX here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text YYY here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text CCC here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text XXX here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text DDD here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text XXX here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text YYY here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text ZZZ here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text EEE here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text XXX here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text YYY here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text FFF here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text XXX here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text YYY here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text ZZZ here>

$sed = file|sed 'N;s/\n/\t/;/\S\+\s\+table name/!d'|sed =|sed 'N;s/\n/\t/;s/\(\S\+\)\s\+\([^>]\+\)>/\2 slonyid="\1">/;s#\(\S\+\)\s\+\(.*\)#\1 s/.*/\2/#'|sed -f - file
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text AAA here slonyid="1">
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text XXX here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text YYY here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text ZZZ here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text BBB here slonyid="2">
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text XXX here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text YYY here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text CCC here slonyid="3">
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text XXX here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text DDD here slonyid="4">
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text XXX here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text YYY here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text ZZZ here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text EEE here slonyid="5">
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text XXX here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text YYY here>
table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text FFF here slonyid="6">
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text XXX here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text YYY here>
index name="dbname.tablename" lots of text ZZZ here>
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starting number is 1 instead of 0 - imo this can't be fixed. –  Endoro Jun 29 '13 at 13:38

This perl one-liner will do the trick if I understand your question correctly:

perl -pi.bak -e 'BEGIN {$count=0}; if (/^table name=/) { s/^(table name=.*)>$/$1 slonyId="$count">/; $count++}' inputFile.xml

These options tell perl to loop over the given filenames and creates a backup with the name "orig_filname.bak":

perl -pi.bak -e

This initializes the $count variable:

BEGIN {$count=0};

This increments count and does the replacement you asked for:

if (/^table name=/) { s/^(table name=.*)>$/$1 slonyId="$count">/; $count++}

Then just provide the list of filenames at the end:

inputFile.xml

This is not a very robust solution and could break if any lines in your file don't match the description you gave above, but it should work for your problem.

I think I'm too new to comment on the other solutions directly, but in my tests FDinoff's solution will add the slonyId to a line that looks like this:

not a table name="dbname.tablename" lots of text here>

And Amit's solution will add the slonyId to every line, not just lines that begin with "table name".

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You should never edit XML files using line-by-line string manipulations. XML isn't structured like that. Always use a proper XML parser, like Perl's XML::LibXML:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use XML::LibXML;

my $xml = XML::LibXML->new->parse_file('/path/to/input.xml');

my $i = 0;
$_->setAttribute('slonyId', $i++) for $xml->findnodes('//table');

$xml->toFile('/path/to/output.xml')
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The snippet the OP posted isn't valid XML, so if you tried with just that it's unsurprising you got an error. –  Ansgar Wiechers Jun 29 '13 at 16:01
2  
But it is XML. Or at least the OP claimed it was. –  Ansgar Wiechers Jun 29 '13 at 16:23
    
I said shouldn't, not can't. And it's actually pretty simple: if your input is XML: use an XML parser. If your input isn't XML: use whatever else is appropriate. Since only the OP can clarify whether or not the file is valid XML I'm not going to continue this pointless argument. –  Ansgar Wiechers Jun 29 '13 at 16:55

vim solution

Use global to find table name= in a line. and replace the > on that line with slonyId="number"> You can do this by using using the following two line.

:let i = 0
:g/^table name=/s/>/\='slonyId="' . i . '"' . submatch(0)/ | let i=i+1

The first line initializes i to 0. The substitute takes the first element of that list every time it does a match and uses string concatenation to generate the correct string. Then after the substitute i will be incremented. So that the next substitute gets the next number in the sequence.

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