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How I can change element order and positions within a div using media queries? The following image shows the desired behaviour(use left image when browser window is smaller than 1000px wide, the second when bigger.):

positioning

My first attempt using 'normal' placement on first case and use float on the second:

.box2 {
  float: right;
}

but then the element 2 (green) aligns on extreme right of container. Not close to the first element.

fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/vmkRM/1/

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To clarify: you want the left image if the display is portrait, and the right image if the display is landscape? –  Dai Jun 29 '13 at 4:22
    
oh, I wasn't clear enough, I want left image if browser is not wide enough to render right image. –  Jhonny Everson Jun 29 '13 at 4:23
    
Do you know the sizes (particularly heights) of the two boxes? –  jcsanyi Jun 29 '13 at 4:40
    
strictly speaking, no. If it makes easier, the height could be forced to fixed value, I think. –  Jhonny Everson Jun 29 '13 at 4:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming you have standard HTML that looks like this:

<div id=outer>
    <div id=box1></div>
    <div id=box2></div>
</div>

And CSS like this:

#box1 {
    width: 150px;
    height: 50px;
    background-color: green;
    margin: 10px;
}
#box2 {
    width: 200px;
    height: 100px;
    background-color: orange;
    margin: 10px;
}

I'd achieve the narrow version by adding this CSS:

#box1, #box2 {
    margin-left: auto;
    margin-right: auto;
}

And I'd achieve the wide version by adding this CSS instead:

#outer {
    float: left;
}
#box1, #box2 {
    float: right;
}
#box1 {
    margin-top: 35px;
}

Note that I'm cheating a bit by manually calculating the extra top-margin in order to vertically align the boxes.

Putting it all together with media queries to do it automatically would look like this:

#box1 {
    width: 150px;
    height: 50px;
    background-color: green;
    margin: 10px auto 10px auto;
}
#box2 {
    width: 200px;
    height: 100px;
    background-color: orange;
    margin: 10px auto 10px auto;
}
@media (min-width: 450px) {
    #outer {
        float: left;
    }
    #box1, #box2 {
        margin: 10px;
        float: right;
    }
    #box1 {
        margin-top: 35px;
    }
}

A working fiddle is here: http://jsfiddle.net/UwtZW/
(Note that I've used narrower widths to make it work nicely in the fiddle - but it should be easy to adapt to the actual widths you need)

If anybody knows how to achieve the vertical alignment automatically without knowing the heights, I'd be very interested to learn. When I try, I can't get past the float / vertical-alignment conflict.

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When I size the display pane to make <body> exactly 400px, it breaks, and the vertical layout is right justified. I'm a bit mystified why it's centered the rest of the time I must admit. –  Gus Jun 29 '13 at 5:12
    
@Gus It's probably because the wide layout is wrapping before the new styles kick in - the @media trigger for switching styles should be wider. –  jcsanyi Jun 29 '13 at 5:14
    
200px + 150px for the boxes, plus 4 x 10px for the margins, plus the default body margin, was causing a wrap at 400px. I've updated my code to switch styles at 450 instead. –  jcsanyi Jun 29 '13 at 5:18

try this

http://jsfiddle.net/vmkRM/3/

<head runat="server">
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0">
    <title></title>
</head>
<body>
    <style type="text/css">
                @media (max-width: 1000px)
    {

        .container
        {
            width: 200px;
            height: 200px;
        }
        .box1
        {
            margin: 26px 24px;
        }
        .box2
        {
            margin: 13px;
        }
    }
    @media (min-width: 1000px)
    {
        .container .box1
        {
            float: right;
        }
        .container
        {
            width: 400px;
            height: 150px;
        }
        .box1
        {
            margin: 50px 31px;
        }
        .box2
        {
            margin: 31px;
        }
    }
    .container
    {
        border: 1px solid black;
    }





    .box1
    {
        width: 150px;
        height: 40px;
        background-color: #97D077;
    }
    .box2
    {
        width: 170px;
        height: 80px;
        background-color: #FFB366;
    }
    </style>
    <div class="container" id="container1">
        <div class="box1">
            text</div>
        <div class="box2">
            img</div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't seem to handle the alignment (vertically centered on wide, horizontally centered on narrow). –  jcsanyi Jun 29 '13 at 4:53
    
updated answer..jsfiddle.net/vmkRM/3 –  sangram parmar Jun 29 '13 at 5:00
    
Does this automatically align the boxes both horizontally and vertically, or is it manually calculated? –  jcsanyi Jun 29 '13 at 5:00

Although it is not really well enough supported by FF and IE, the flex-box model is the right way to do it (conceptually at least if not for practical purposes). Check out this with chrome:

http://jsfiddle.net/38cNE/4/

The key parts are:

#container1 {
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    display: -webkit-flex;
    -webkit-flex-wrap:wrap;
    -webkit-flex-direction:row;
    -webkit-justify-content:center;
    -webkit-align-items:center;
}

#container2 {
    width: 400px;
    height: 150px;
    display: -webkit-flex;
    -webkit-flex-direction:row-reverse;
    -webkit-justify-content:space-around;
    -webkit-align-items:center;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've never heard of this. Where can I find out more about it? –  jcsanyi Jun 29 '13 at 5:04
    
looks good on chrome, but did not work on Safari or latest Firefox. thanks anyway. –  Jhonny Everson Jun 29 '13 at 5:05
    
Yes, as I said, but keep an eye on it for the near future. caniuse.com/#feat=flexbox –  Gus Jun 29 '13 at 5:28
    
Thanks for the info, @Gus. This has always been a shortcoming of CSS, and it's nice to see there's some sensible solutions being considered. –  jcsanyi Jun 29 '13 at 5:35
    
@jcsanyi I found this page helpful css-tricks.com/snippets/css/a-guide-to-flexbox –  Gus Jun 29 '13 at 16:32

use width 100% for parent DIV, just look this fiddle

<div style="width:100%">
<div style="width:200px;height:200px;border:solid 1px black;position:relative;float:left"></div>
<div style="width:200px;height:100px;border:solid 1px black;position:relative;float:left;margin-top:50px;margin-left:50px">
</div>

http://jsfiddle.net/ablealias/zCFff/

share|improve this answer
    
This does not achieve what the OP is asking for. The item in the right in a wide layout should end up on the top in a narrow layout. –  jcsanyi Jun 29 '13 at 4:30
    
@jcsanyi Thank you –  Able Alias Jun 29 '13 at 4:35

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