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We are using WHILE loop in SQL Server 2008 instead of Cursor. Now I want to find which method is best to write WHILE loop in my procedure.

Method 1 (Using BREAK Keyword):

DECLARE @V_Counter INT = 1;

WHILE (1 = 1)
BEGIN
    PRINT @V_Counter;
    SET @V_Counter = @V_Counter + 1;

    IF @V_Counter = 4
    BEGIN
        BREAK;
    END
END

Method 2 (Using BOOL VARIABLE):

DECLARE @V_Counter INT = 1, @V_CloseLoop TINYINT = 1;

WHILE (@V_CloseLoop = 1)
BEGIN
    PRINT @V_Counter;
    SET @V_Counter = @V_Counter + 1;

    IF @V_Counter = 4
    BEGIN
       SET @V_CloseLoop = 0;
    END
END 

My questions are:

  • Which method I have to use or both are same?
  • Is there any other method which I can use?

Thanks in advance...

share|improve this question
    
We are using WHILE loop ... instead of cursor - a WHILE is still almost as bad as a cursor. You should check if you can avoid using WHILE and go with a truly set-based approach. THAT would really make a noticeable difference in speed –  marc_s Jun 29 '13 at 6:19
    
@marc_s Can you provide me any link of that approach or any example. I want to implement best approach instead of cursor. I found that While loop is better than cursor. So I am trying to implement that in my procedure. –  Saharsh Shah Jun 29 '13 at 6:20
    
Just search Google (or Bing) for SQL Server Thinking in Sets and you'll have plenty of links, e.g. T-SQL Foundations: Thinking in Sets and many, many more! –  marc_s Jun 29 '13 at 6:23
    
in many cases using inline functions will also help to avoid cursors. It will speed up more. –  revoua Jun 29 '13 at 6:25
    
@revoua Please be specific. I have to perform set of operations and business loginc on each row of table. How can I implement that. –  Saharsh Shah Jun 29 '13 at 6:28

1 Answer 1

Which method I have to use or both are same? No, both are not same.

setting the variable to zero will still execute the lines after that, but nothing else in the loop will be executed after the break.

DECLARE @V_Counter INT = 1;

WHILE (1 = 1)
BEGIN
    PRINT @V_Counter;
    SET @V_Counter = @V_Counter + 1;

    IF @V_Counter = 4
    BEGIN
       BREAK;
    END
    PRINT 'STACKOVERFLOW' // this is not executed.
END   


DECLARE @V_Counter INT = 1, @V_CloseLoop TINYINT = 1;

WHILE (@V_CloseLoop = 1)
BEGIN
    PRINT @V_Counter;
    SET @V_Counter = @V_Counter + 1;

    IF @V_Counter = 4
    BEGIN
       SET @V_CloseLoop = 0;
    END
    PRINT 'STACKOVERFLOW' // this is executed.
END 

Using break will always be a clean approach, than setting the variable to zero, as the code will be easy to maintain when we use break than the other way around.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank for the answer but I have not written code after the IF condition. I have written whole business logic before IF condition. So which method is better to use? –  Saharsh Shah Jun 29 '13 at 6:55

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