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input: array of unique integers, sorted

output: all permutations. edit: output order is not important, as long as it's correct :-)

example:

[2, 6, 9]

output:

[ [2, 6, 9], [2, 9, 6], [6, 2, 9], [6, 9, 2], [9, 2, 6], [9, 6, 2] ]
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Is the order important? –  Mark Byers Nov 15 '09 at 16:24
    
For [1, 1] is the answer [ [1, 1] ] or [ [1, 1], [1, 1] ]? –  Mark Byers Nov 15 '09 at 16:28
2  
Input is unique, so [1, 1] would be an invalid input according to the question. –  mhaller Nov 15 '09 at 16:31
    
Sorry, yes - I just noticed that. –  Mark Byers Nov 15 '09 at 16:32
6  
-1. Not community wiki and the problem is insufficiently specified. Have a look at meta.stackexchange.com/questions/24242/… –  Stephan202 Nov 15 '09 at 17:05

13 Answers 13

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A few easy ones, in alphabetical order...

Haskell

import Data.List
permutations

J

(A.~[:i.*/@:>:@i.@#)

Python

from itertools import permutations
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1  
can you please provide a full code for the Haskell example? –  Mark G Nov 15 '09 at 19:04
1  
Oh, cheating. Importing a permutations library isn't nearly the same as writing one. –  McPherrinM Nov 18 '09 at 20:52

Haskell without libraries (63 chars):

p(l)=case(l)of{_:_:_->l>>=(\i->map(i:)(p$filter(i/=)l));_->[l]}
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Haskell without libraries (42 chars)

p []=[[]]
p l=[a:b|a<-l,b<-p$filter(/=a)l]
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This will only work if (Eq a) => [a] and all elements in the list are unique. –  Stephan202 Nov 15 '09 at 17:06
    
(Which the input is, in this case, so it's ok :) –  Stephan202 Nov 15 '09 at 17:09
    
Then again, so is Dario's answer. –  codebliss Nov 15 '09 at 17:24
    
@codebliss: correct. –  Stephan202 Nov 15 '09 at 19:27

57 characters not evaluating or comparing elements (gives permutations in lexicographical order provided the original list is sorted):

p[]=[[]];p s=[x:y|(h,x:t)<-inits s`zip`tails s,y<-p$h++t]
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Python without using libraries:

f=lambda a:a and[[e]+x for i,e in enumerate(a)for x in f(a[:i]+a[i+1:])]or[a]

Usage:

print f([2,6,9])

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Prolog

perm(List,[H|Perm]):-delete(H,List,Rest),perm(Rest,Perm).
perm([],[]).

delete(X,[X|T],T).
delete(X,[H|T],[H|NT]):-delete(X,T,NT).
share|improve this answer

Implement permutations in Haskell (76 75 characters)

i e[]=[[e]]
i e(a:b)=(e:a:b):[a:s|s<-i e b]
f=foldr(\e->concatMap(i e))[[]]

Unlike some other Haskell answers, this one doesn't evaluate the elements of its input list.

I've been looking around for some prelude function that makes defining i (for "insert") more concise than the above, but so far I haven't found anything...

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you can replace the lambda with ((>>=).i) –  user3329719 Aug 28 at 17:30

C++

#include <algorithm>
std::next_permutation
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#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
void Permute(string permutation,string dict){
    if(dict.length()==0)
    	cout<<permutation;
    for(int i=0;i<dict.size();i++){
    	Permute(permutation+dict[i],
    		dict.substr(0,i)+dict.substr(i+1));
    }
}
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Perl

Maybe not the most efficient nor shortest-code version, but I thought I'd give it a try for practice. Of course $ignore may be substituted by $i for shorter code.

p([2,6,9], []);

sub p {
  my ($a, $ignore) = @_;
  for(my $n = 0; $n <= $#$a; ++$n){
    if(!{map {$_ => 1} @$ignore}->{$n}){
      if($#$a == $#$ignore + 1){
        print join(",", map {$a->[$_]} (@$ignore, $n)), "\n";
      }
      else {
        p($a, [@$ignore, $n]);
      }
    }
  }
}
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F#

I am using this as a way to learn F# so I would greatly appreciate anyone's suggestions on improving the code here, especially on the factorial calculation. Also, I try to avoid recursive functions whenever possible unless they can be made tail recursive, just as a personal challenge.

#light
let permutations lst =
    let result = ref [lst]
    for i = 1 to (List.fold (fun number product -> number * product) 1 [List.length(lst) .. -1 .. 1]) / (lst.Length - 1) do
        for start = 0 to (List.length(lst) - 2) do
            result := [List.permute (fun n -> match n with |_ when n=start->(start+1) |_ when n-1=start->start |_->n) (result.Value.Item(result.Value.Length-1))]
                      |> List.append result.Value
            ()
    Seq.take (result.Value.Length-1) result.Value // Have to get rid of the last one which is a duplicate of the given list.

permutations [2;6;9] |> Seq.iter (fun l -> printfn "%A" l)
System.Console.ReadKey(true) |> ignore
share|improve this answer
    
A few tips: 1. Replace 'Seq.iter (fun l -> printfn "%A" l)' by 'Seq.iter (printfn "%A") ... 2. !result is the same as result.Value ... 3. here's a shorter factorial: 'let fac n = Seq.reduce (*) [1..n]' ... 4. 'fun n -> match n with |_ when n=start<etc...>' can be replaced by 'function |n when n=start<etc...>' ... 5. You can omit the () in your for loop, since updating the result already is a unit action. –  cfern Nov 20 '09 at 14:16
    
Excellent! Thank you cfern. –  David Nov 20 '09 at 15:29

C# (not using recursion)

Not the shortest, but here's an implemenetation of Edsger Dijkstra's algorithm from the classic text A Discipline of Programming (Prentice-Hall). (I mostly just wanted to see if it could be done without recursion and have a play with generics).

static List<T> GetNext<T>(List<T> input) where T : IComparable<T>, IEquatable<T>    
{
    int N = input.Count;		
    int i, j;	
    for (i = N - 2; i > -1; i--)
        if (input[i].CompareTo(input[i+1]) < 0)				                     
            break;  								

    if (i < 0)
        return null;		

    j = N - 1;
    while (input[j].CompareTo(input[i]) <= 0)
        j = j - 1;					
    swap(input, i, j); 		

    i+=2; j = N;	
    while (i < j)
    {
        swap(input, i - 1, j - 1);		
        i++;
        j--;
    }				
    return input;
}
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What is 'swap'? –  Maxim Zaslavsky Dec 5 '09 at 3:24
    
Just a simple function that I wrote, all it does it swap around the items in the list specified by the 2nd and 2rd arguments. So if the list is {1. 2. 4, 6, 2, 3}, after calling swap(list, 2, 4) it will be {1. 2. 2, 6, 4, 3}. The items are zero based! –  Matt Warren Dec 6 '09 at 16:14

Using Permutations in .NET for Improved Systems Security

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1  
Are you sure you've read the question? –  user181548 Nov 15 '09 at 16:16
12  
this is code golf, not "when should I use premutations?" :D –  Gordon Gustafson Nov 15 '09 at 16:32

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