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Basically I want the best solution for the following problem:

    //  A.h
    @interface A : NSObject

    @end

    //  A.m
#import "A.h"

@implementation A

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        [self childWillOverride];
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)childWillOverride {
    NSLog(@"childWillOverride - A");
}
@end
//  B.h
#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>
#import "A.h"

@interface B : A

@end

//  B.m
#import "B.h"

@implementation B

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        [self childWillOverride];
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)childWillOverride {
    [super childWillOverride]; // This is not possible
    NSLog(@"childWillOverride - B");
}

@end

I don't want to move the function name to A.h or I don't want to create a new Category or .h file for the function name. Do you have other ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
By the way, I believe when you init the B object you will call B's childWillOverride twice, which I'm doubt was your intent. – Rob Jun 29 '13 at 11:44
    
So [[A alloc] init] should call childWillOverride from A? And [[B alloc] init] should call childWillOverride from B or both? – Martin R Jun 29 '13 at 15:28
    
@MartinR When B's init calls A's init, and when A's init subsequently calls [self childWillOverride], it actually ends up calling B's implementation of childWillOverride (which subsequently calls A's implementation). Thus, when B's init called [super init], it actually called childWillOverride already, and presumably should not do so again. – Rob Jun 30 '13 at 3:03
1  
@Rob: My question was meant for the OP, as to find out what he wants to achieve. – Martin R Jun 30 '13 at 3:54
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Personally, I'd rather just create a separate .h file for those protected methods, like Apple did for <UIKit/UIGestureRecognizerSubclass.h>.

Another approach (which I don't like), is to use a private class extension:

Thus, your B.m would be:

#import "B.h"

@interface A ()
- (void) childWillOverride;
@end

@implementation B

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        [self childWillOverride];
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)childWillOverride {
    [super childWillOverride]; // This is now possible
    NSLog(@"childWillOverride - B");
}

@end

I don't like using class extensions this way (it's strange to define the private implementation of A in B's .m file), so I'd personally use the separate .h approach.

share|improve this answer
1  
I didn't know that the apple is solving the problem in that way. I dont' like the solution where I define the private A method in B too. – flatronka Jun 29 '13 at 12:06
1  
@flatronka - you are trying to do something you shouldn't, override a private method, so you are going to get your hands dirty one way or another. The solution shown by Rob has the benefit of being pretty clean, why don't you like it? The other solution is to call runtime methods to locate the actual implementation of the method and to call it directly - far more messy. – CRD Jun 29 '13 at 19:30

I use a protected category for this kind of thing:

// A.h
@interface A : NSObject
@end

// A.m
#import "A.h"
@implementation A
- (void)subclassWillOverrideButNobodyElseWill
{
  NSLog(@"Heyyyyyy");
}
@end

// A+Protected.h
#import "A.h"
@interface A (Protected)
- (void)subclassWillOverrideButNobodyElseWill;
@end

// B.h
@interface B : A
@end

// B.m
#import "A+Protected.h"
@implmentation B
- (void)subclassWillOverrideButNobodyElseWill
{
  [super subclassWillOverrideButNobodyElseWill]
  NSLog(@"Worrrrrrld");
}
@end

// Something.m
B *b = [B new];
[b subclassWillOverrideButNobodyElseWill];

// Console results:
Heyyyyyy
Worrrrrrld
share|improve this answer

You can use the following code

if ([super respondsToSelector:@selector(childWillOverride)]) {
    [super performSelector:@selector(childWillOverride)];
}
share|improve this answer
    
good idea, but this causes stackoverflow :) – flatronka Jun 29 '13 at 11:51
    
No it doesn't as we will call the super not self. – mohamede1945 Jun 29 '13 at 12:05
1  
@mohamede1945 - Sorry but flatronka is correct. While not a bad approach to explore it doesn't work. The super call effectively tells the runtime at what point in the inheritance hierarchy to start its search for a method, and in your example the method being searched for is performSelector:. Whether you start at self or super a search for performSelector: will find the same method, and that method will start its own search at self... – CRD Jun 29 '13 at 19:26

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