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my switch statement has about ten outcome, but some of them need 1/2 loops to check, so i can't write them within case(condition), so i've tried using more than one default case, is this possible?

<?php

switch(true) {
case 1:
    break;
case 2:
    break;
default:
    echo "this text is never printed ??";

    while(true) {
        while(true) { // case 3
            break 3;
        }

        break;
    }

    while(true) {
        // case 4
        break 2;
    }
case 5:
    break;
default:
    while(true) {
        // case 6
        break 2;
    }
case 7:
    break;
}

?>

is this sort of thing possible, as my first default doesn't seem to be executing at all?!

thanks

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2  
Apart from your question, this is most definitely a fine example for the merits of use of good ol' encapsulation. – Kyle Rozendo Nov 15 '09 at 16:30
    
okay thanks guys. i've done what you have said and put all these "special cases" in a deault case at the end, which means i've had to order my code differently :( i'd quite like a special class which you can put anywhere in the structure, and the correct number of breaks is called, then the switch ends, otherwise, check the rest of the cases. this would stop the work arounds in the default case! Franz: i'm writing a function that looks at pokers cards and analyses what hand you have. so case 1 would have been royal flush, and i wanted to keep it in order and stop after it finds the best hand – Juddling Nov 15 '09 at 16:36
    
Those who are saying you can have only one default are incorrect; it is true that only the last one would be executed. And those who say that evaluation stops when the default case is reached are also incorrect. These are easy to test, if anyone is so inclined. – GZipp Nov 15 '09 at 18:39
    
@Judding - In your example code the default isn't executed because true == 1. Put some echo statements in your cases to see what's happening (or not, and keep on guessing). – GZipp Nov 15 '09 at 18:54
    
@GZipp: Whether or not the PHP parser is willing to interpret multiple default s doesn't change the fact that it makes zero logical sense to have more than one. Multiple default s is WRONG no matter what the PHP parser/runtime allow. You do however, make a good point about switch(true) always leading to case 1: which I overlooked initially. switch(true) should almost certainly be changed to switch($someVariable) where $someVariable contains a value corresponding to one of the case s. With that modification, most of the answers below hold true. – Asaph Nov 15 '09 at 21:34
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You cannot have more than one default in a switch statement. Also, default should be at the end of of the switch after all the case statements.

What might be happening when your code is run through the PHP engine is that the parser is reading the switch statements into a hash map type data structure and each time the parser finds a default label, it's overwriting the existing entry in the hash map. So only last default label ends up in the data structure that gets used in execution.

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No this isn't possible, you can't have more than one default case in a switch statement, you'll need to put additional logic into the single final case statement.

when the default case is reached it captures all conditions so later cases are not evaluated.

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To answer your question - no, it is only possible to have one default and that at the end. I'm not sure whether you can place other cases after the default, but what I'm sure of is that they would never be reached...

EDIT: Also, I don't see what you're trying to do there. What's the point? Could you explain a bit? We might be able to help you accomplish what you want to do

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As Baxter writes, if you need to do some special checking for some of the cases, just leave them out and do the checks in the default section. – Franz Nov 15 '09 at 16:19

You can have only one default in a switch. Remember that Zend is not the only thing that parses PHP, you may confuse other parsers by not putting the default case as the very last part of the switch.

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