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I need to do bitewise operations on 32bit integers (that indeed represent chars, but whatever).

Is the following kind of code safe?

uint32_t input;
input = ...;

if(input & 0x03000000) {
    output  = 0x40000000;
    output |= (input & 0xFC000000) >> 2;

I mean, in the "if" statement, I am doing a bitwise operation on, on the left side, a uint32_t, and on the right side... I don't know!

So do you know the type and size (by that I mean on how much bytes is it stored) of hard-coded "0x03000000" ?

Is it possible that some systems consider 0x03000000 as an int and hence code it only on 2 bytes, which would be catastrophic?

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1  
Looks perfectly fine to me. –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 29 '13 at 11:24
1  
The right side is promoted to the smallest integer type it fits in (or int if it would be shorter than int), so the comparison is safe. –  user529758 Jun 29 '13 at 11:26
    
1. You can always cast it to what you need: (uint32_t)0x03000000. 2. You should make these #define for clarity and re-use. You can add the cast too: #define MYBITS (uint32_t)0x03000000. –  user2513931 Jun 29 '13 at 14:18
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is the following kind of code safe?

Yes, it is.

So do you know the type and size (by that I mean on how much bytes is it stored) of hard-coded "0x03000000" ?

0x03000000 is int on a system with 32-bit int and long on a system with 16-bit int.

(As uint32_t is present here I assume two's complement and CHAR_BIT of 8. Also I don't know any system with 16-bit int and 64-bit long.)

Is it possible that some systems consider 0x03000000 as an int and hence code it only on 2 bytes, which would be catastrophic?

See above on a 16-bit int system, 0x03000000 is a long and is 32-bit. An hexadecimal constant in C is the first type in which it can be represented: int, unsigned int, long, unsigned long, long long, unsigned long long

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OK but what if I use 0x00000001 instead? On 16-bit system it will be represented as a 16-bit int. Then I will do a bitewise operation between a 32-bit uint32_t and a 16-bit 0x00000001. Will that throw an error or is it OK? –  KrisWebDev Jun 29 '13 at 11:36
2  
0x00000001 is guaranteed to be an int. In the bitwise expression with an uint32_t the constant will be promoted to uint32_t, so no problem. –  ouah Jun 29 '13 at 11:38
    
@ouah: I think on a platform where int is 64 bit wide, both sides would be converted to int. –  Kerrek SB Jun 29 '13 at 11:55
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