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I have this code:

for($i = 1; $i <= $max; $i+=0.1) {
    echo "$i<br>";
}

if the variable $max = 6; the results are: 1, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 .... 5.8, 5.9, 6 , but when the variable $max = 4 the results are: 1, 1.1 ... 3.8, 3.9, but the number 4 is missing.

Please explain this behavior, and a possible solution to this.

the results are the same when i use the condition $i <= $max; or $i < $max;

The bug occurs when $max is 2, 3 or 4

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I think this has something to do with roundoff problems: docs.oracle.com/cd/E19957-01/806-3568/ncg_goldberg.html In fact, the error is not the missing 4 but the printed 6 –  Aurelio De Rosa Jun 29 '13 at 11:54
2  
read the red block about Floating point precision. Floating point numbers –  bitWorking Jun 29 '13 at 11:56
1  
if i modify the loop 'for($i = 1; $i <= $max; $i+=0.1)' the problem remains the same –  lucian Jun 29 '13 at 11:57
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should set the precision when using integers,

like this:

$e = 0.0001;
   while($i > 0) {
   echo($i);
   $i--;
}
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From http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.float.php

Additionally, rational numbers that are exactly representable as floating point numbers in base 10, like 0.1 or 0.7, do not have an exact representation as floating point numbers in base 2, which is used internally, no matter the size of the mantissa. Hence, they cannot be converted into their internal binary counterparts without a small loss of precision.

So to overcome this you could multiply your numbers by 10. So $max is 40 or 60.

for($i = 10; $i <= $max; $i+=1) {
    echo ($i/10).'<br>';
}
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  You can use of number_format()

<?php
$max=6;
for($i = 1; number_format($i,2) < number_format($max,2); $i+=0.1) {
echo $i."<br>";     
}

?>

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1  
Great solution! –  nevermind Jun 29 '13 at 12:39
1  
works well! thanks –  lucian Jun 29 '13 at 15:03
    
set $max = 100 and see what happens. The rounding error starts at 54.2 in my case. –  bitWorking Jun 29 '13 at 16:07
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$err = .000001//allowable error
for($i = 1; $i <= $max+$err; $i+=0.1) {
    echo "$i<br>";
}
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thanks, this solves the problem too. please upvote the answer. –  lucian Jun 29 '13 at 12:24
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