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This is my code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class C
{
private:
    string str;
    friend void func();
};


void func()
{
        str = "Lala";
        cout << str << endl;

}

int main()
{
    func();
}

I don't understand why this doesn't work.
In my bigger project I want to acces private variables of a class with a function out of class.
Here I made a class C and made a function func(); to be its friend.But still I can't use it's private variables in function.
What I did wrong and is there a better way to do this?

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6  
On which object is func supposed to operate? –  Matteo Italia Jun 29 '13 at 13:34
    
How does it not work? –  Mark Jun 29 '13 at 13:34
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closed as off-topic by jogojapan, soon, Mohammad Ali Baydoun, Griwes, Balog Pal Jun 30 '13 at 21:14

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  • "Questions must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Tell us what you've tried to do, why it didn't work, and how it should work. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – jogojapan, soon, Mohammad Ali Baydoun, Griwes, Balog Pal
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6 Answers

It doesn't work because void func(); is not a member function of the class, it's just declared as a friend function to it, meaning it can access the private members.

You have no instance of the class C, so you can't possibly refer to any valid str variable.

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Next time, please also quote the errors you get. In this case, there will be a compile error stating the symbol "str" has not been defined within func().

If you want to access the member str of a class instance of C, you need such an instance, as in:

void func(){
    C c;
    c.str = "Lala";
    cout << c.str << endl;

}
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func() is not a member function, and it is not receiving any parameter of type C, what object is it supposed to operate on?

func must either be a member function of C (in which case you'll invocate it over an instance of C, and friend is not necessary), either a function that receives some parameter of type C (or create a local C object), on which it can work on, even accessing its private fields.

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This doesn't work since str is not defined inside func(). You should have an instance of C.

void func()
{
    C foo;
    foo.str = "Lala";
    cout << str << endl;
}

If you need to you can pass the C instance as a parameter:

void func(C &foo)
{
    foo.str = "Lala";
    cout << str << endl;
}
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@soon Meh it has been way too long since I coded in C++. –  the_drow Jun 29 '13 at 13:39
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The problem

Let's look at your code piece by piece:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

Just a short note here: It is a bad idea to use using namespace std;.

class C
{
private:
    string str;
    friend void func();
};

Here you define a class C. You declare that objects of this class will contain a string, which is private (i.e. may only be accessed by class members and friends), and you declare the global function void func() a friend, that is, it is allowed to access the private members (in this case str) of the class C and of any object of type C. Note that apart from that permission, func is in no way related to the class C.

void func()
{
        str = "Lala";
        cout << str << endl;

}

Here you try to assign to a variable str which you never declared. Remember that there's no relation of func to the class C other than that it may access the private members of C and objects of type C. However, there's no object of type C in sight, and even if there were, there's nothing to tell the compiler from which object str is to be taken, or even that you are speaking about the str in C. I'll remember you again that func is completely independent of C, so the code is interpreted the same way as if C wouldn't have declared it a friend.

int main()
{
    func();
}

OK, nothing special here, you're just calling func.

How to fix it

Now, how to fix your code? Well, there are several possibilities:

Supplying objects

Local objects

Since str is a member of objects of class C, you'll need an object of the class. So you could for example do:

void func()
{
  C object;
  object.str = "Lala";
  std::cout << object.str << std::endl;
}

Here you create a local object in func, assign to that object's str member a value and then outputs it. To see that different objects have different members, you can e.g. write:

void func()
{
  C object1, object2;
  object1.str = "Lala";
  object2.str = "Lele";
  std::cout << object1.str << " -- " << object2.str << "\n";
}

This outputs Lala -- Lele because the first object's str member has the value "Lala" while the second object's str member has the value "Lele".

Function arguments

Another option is that you pass the object as argument, e.g.

void func(C object)
{
  std::cout << object.str << " -- ";
  object.str = "Lele";
  std::cout << object.str << " -- ";
}

int main()
{
  C main_object;
  main_object.str = "Lala";
  func(main_object);
  std::cout << object.str << std::endl;
}

This prints Lala -- Lele -- Lala.

What happens here is that in main an object is created, whose str member is assigned the valeu "Lala". On call to func, a copy of that object is created, which you then access from func. Since it's a copy, it initially also contains the same value "Lala", whichfuncthen outputs. Then the assignment infuncchanges thestrmember *of that copy* to"Lele"and outputs that. The original object is not affected as the output inmain` shows.

So you see, there can be several objects, and it is crucial that you say the str member of which object you want to access.

Now if you do not intend to change the object in the called function, making a copy is just a waste of time, therefore you can also pass it as a reference to const:

void func(C const& object)
{
  std::cout << object.str << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
  C main_object;
  main_object.str = "Lala";
  func(main_object);
}

The argument C const& says "I want to directly access the object the caller gives me, but I promise not to change it." The "directly access" part is denoted by the &, and the "I promise not to change it" is denoted by the const. The compiler actually checks that you hold your promise and don't try to change it (that is, if in func you tried to do object.str = "Lele", the compiler would complain (there are ways to tell the compiler to shut up about that, but you shouldn't do that; just keep your promises). However note that this applies again only to that specific object; for example, the following code is completely OK:

void func(C const& object)
{
  C another_object;
  another_object.str = "Lele";
  std::cout << object.str << " -- " << another_object.str << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
  C main_object;
  main_object.str = "Lala";
  func(main_object);
}

This gives no error and prints Lala -- Lele because you're dealing again with different objects.

Of course there may be the case that you do want to change the object you are passed. Then you can just use & without const:

void func(C& object)
{
  std::cout << object.str << " -- ";
  object.str = "Lele";
  std::cout << object.str << " -- ";
}

int main()
{
  C main_object;
  main_object.str = "Lala";
  func(main_object);
  std::cout << object.str << std::endl;
}

This prints Lala -- Lele -- Lele.

Now you again directly access the object passed as argument from main, but this time, you don't promise that you don't change it, and indeed you do change it. The output from main demonstrates that indeed main_object was changed.

Making the variable a static member

Now, there's the possibility that you really want there to only ever be one str in C, not a separate one for each object of that type. If you are absolutely positive that this is what you want, then you can make str a static member of the class:

class C
{
private:
  static std::string str; // note the keyword "static" here
  friend void func();
};

std::string C::str; // You have to have an extra definition for class static variables!

Now you can access str without having an object of C available. However note that you still need to tell the compiler inside func that you want to access the str inside C:

void func()
{
  C::str = "Lala";
  std::cout << C::str << std::endl;
}

You can also access the variable on object as if it were a member of that object. However be aware that this does not mean that different objects still have their own str. For example, with the changed class definition, we will gett different behaviour for the code from above:

void func()
{
  C object1, object2;
  object1.str = "Lala";
  object2.str = "Lele";
  std::cout << object1.str << " -- " << object2.str << "\n";
}

Now we will get the output Lele -- Lele because there's only one str, which does not depend on the object (the syntax object1.str in this case is misleading in that respect; actually here it means "the str defined for the type of object1, that is, C").

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void func(C* object)
{
        object->str = "Lala";
        cout << object->str << endl;

}

Since func is not a member of the class, so you can't call it like object.func(). Thus the function won't know which object of the class you wish to change. So you have to explicitly pass the object pointer to the function. Use a reference would also do.

Or you can declare str as static. But static member will make all instances of the class share the same value.

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1  
Since the OP is a complete beginner I believe it might be useful to explain in this answer why exactly you used a pointer. Also why are not using a reference? –  the_drow Jun 29 '13 at 13:41
    
OMG, why did I get downvoted? –  Immueggpain Jun 29 '13 at 14:58
    
see my comment. and it wasn't me btw. –  the_drow Jun 29 '13 at 16:53
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