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Hi all i have for loop with a ~ operator never found this before on any of the code

    for (int i = 0; i < bytes.length; i++) {
        mashed[i] = (byte) ~bytes[i];

        }

what does the ~ do?

i haven't found anything like this on the internet or before anywhere so maybe someone can help me thanks in advance

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marked as duplicate by assylias, Marko Topolnik, Reimeus, Brian Roach, arshajii Jun 29 '13 at 16:34

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8 Answers 8

Its an operator of ~ bitwise NOT

The bitwise NOT "~" operator inverts each bit in the operand i.e. this operator changes all the ones to zeros and all the zeros to ones.

All operators

And to know how internally works :How does the bitwise complement (~) operator work?

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It is the bitwise complement operator.

Example:

If the value is 2 (0000 0010), the bitwise complement is 1111 1101

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From Java's tutorials, http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/op3.html,

The unary bitwise complement operator "~" inverts a bit pattern; it can be applied to any of the integral types, making every "0" a "1" and every "1" a "0". For example, a byte contains 8 bits; applying this operator to a value whose bit pattern is "00000000" would change its pattern to "11111111".

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It is bitwise operator which will apply not gate on every bit of the data. Eg when data bits are 101, then it will become 010.

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The ~ is for bitwise inversion -- 0s become 1s, 1s become 0s.

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The ~ operator is bitwise NOT, it inverts the bits in a binary number:

NOT 011100
  = 100011
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From the docs:

The unary bitwise complement operator "~" inverts a bit pattern; it can be applied to any of the integral types, making every "0" a "1" and every "1" a "0". For example, a byte contains 8 bits; applying this operator to a value whose bit pattern is "00000000" would change its pattern to "11111111".

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The Tilde (~) does a bitwise compliment of a numerical value.

1011 0011 = ~0100 1100
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