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this is the question--
Write a program to manipulate the temperature details as given below.
- Input the number of days to be calculated. – Main function
- Input temperature in Celsius – input function
- Convert the temperature from Celsius to Fahrenheit.- Separate function
- find the average temperature in Fahrenheit.

how can I make this program without initial size of array ??

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
void input(int);
int temp[10];
int d;
void main()
{
    int x=0;
    float avg=0,t=0;
    printf("\nHow many days : ");
    scanf("%d",&d);
    input(d);
    conv();
    for(x=0;x<d;x++)
    {
        t=t+temp[x];
    }
    avg=t/d;
    printf("Avarage is %f",avg);
    getch();
}
void input(int d)
{
    int x=0;
    for(x=0;x<d;x++)
    {
        printf("Input temperature in Celsius for #%d day",x+1);
        scanf("%d",&temp[x]);
    }
}
void conv()
{
    int x=0;
    for(x=0;x<d;x++)
    {
        temp[x]=1.8*temp[x]+32;
    }
}
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Is your compiler supports c99? –  haccks Jun 29 '13 at 15:48
1  
1) #include<conio.h> non-standard header 2) void main() main() should return int. –  wildplasser Jun 29 '13 at 15:59
    
how to check is my compiler supports c99. i'm beginner for C language :) –  ViSTA Jun 29 '13 at 16:24
    
BTW: temp[x]=1.8*temp[x]+32 performs a truncate-towards-zero rounding, biasing inexact results toward 0. Recommend ‘(int) round(1.8*temp[x]+32)’. You'll get a better average in the end. (The usual idiom +0.5 only works here if all conversions are positive.) –  chux Jun 29 '13 at 18:05
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6 Answers

In C arrays and pointers are closely related. In fact, by design an array is just a syntax convention for accessing a pointer to an allocated memory.

So in C the statement

 anyarray[n] 

is the same as

 *(anyarray+n)

Using pointer arithmetic.

You don't really have to worry about the details to make it "work" as it is designed to be somewhat intuitive.

Just create a pointer, and allocate the memory and then access it like as an array.

Here is some examples --

int *temp = null; // this will be our array


// allocate space for 10 items
temp = malloc(sizeof(int)*10);


// reference the first element of temp
temp[0] = 70;


// free the memory when done
free(temp);

Remember -- if you access outside of the allocated area you will have unknown effects.

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You will need to declare temp as an int pointer (instead of an int array). Then, you can use malloc in your main (after your first scanf):

temp = malloc(d * sizeof(int));
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i can't understand what you say. i was trying it like this printf("\nHow many days : "); scanf("%d",&d); int temp[d]; but it's not working :( –  ViSTA Jun 29 '13 at 15:55
    
You need to change the line int temp[10] to int *temp. Then, instead of doing int temp[d], use the code I provided in my answer. –  Drew McGowen Jun 29 '13 at 16:08
    
i don't about malloc. can you please tall me how can i use this for my program. –  ViSTA Jun 29 '13 at 16:17
    
malloc basically lets you reserve some memory for whatever purpose you need it for, but when you don't know the size ahead of time. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_dynamic_memory_allocation might be a good place to start –  Drew McGowen Jun 29 '13 at 17:28
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An array without an initial size is basically just a pointer. In order to dynamically set the size of the array, you need to use the malloc() or calloc() functions. These will allocate a specified amount of bytes of memory.

In your code above, declare temp as an int pointer

int *temp;

Then allocate space for it using malloc() or calloc(). The argument that these functions take is is the number of bytes of memory to allocate. In this case, you want enough space for d ints. So...

temp = malloc(d * sizeof(int));

malloc returns a pointer to the first byte in the block of memory that was just allocated. Regular arrays are simply pointers to the first byte in a sectioned off block of memory, which is exactly what temp is now. Thus, you can treat the temp pointer as an array! Like so:

temp[1] = 10;
int foo = temp[1];
printf("%d", foo);

Outputs

10
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Allocate the "array" dynamically on the heap after you read the size.

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1  
Why not just allocate the array with the needed size in the first place? –  Drew McGowen Jun 29 '13 at 15:43
    
@DrewMcGowen You're right, I didn't read the code and didn't see that the size is read. Updated answer to reflect that. –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 29 '13 at 15:45
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If your compiler supports c99, then simply use VLA(variable length array).Use like this:

void input(int);

 int d;
 void main()
 {
    int x=0;
    float avg=0,t=0;
    printf("\nHow many days : ");
    scanf("%d",&d);
    int temp[d];
    input(d);
    conv();
    for(x=0;x<d;x++)
    {
       t=t+temp[x];
    }
    avg=t/d;
    printf("Avarage is %f",avg);
    getch();
  }

Now temp[] is defined inside main() after date input.

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@Down voter,it is clear from his post that he has very little knowledge of pointers......keep in mind> –  haccks Jun 29 '13 at 16:00
    
but it's getting some error "constant expression required" –  ViSTA Jun 29 '13 at 16:15
    
@user2534857, which compiler are you using? –  haccks Jun 29 '13 at 16:16
    
@user2534857; Give me information about your compiler/IDE(code::block,Dev-c++,Visual basics etc) –  haccks Jun 29 '13 at 16:20
    
@Hogan; Then why did't he accepted yet any answer explained by pointer,although answers are correct? –  haccks Jun 29 '13 at 16:25
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I didn't change anything else so you may see it clearly.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>   //here
void input(int);
int *temp=0;  //here
int d;
void main()
{
    int x=0;
    float avg=0,t=0;
    printf("\nHow many days : ");
    scanf("%d",&d);
    temp=malloc(d * sizeof(int));  //here
    input(d);
    conv();
    for(x=0;x<d;x++)
    {
        t=t+temp[x];
    }
    avg=t/d;
    printf("Avarage is %f",avg);
    getch();
}
void input(int d)
{
    int x=0;
    for(x=0;x<d;x++)
    {
        printf("Input temperature in Celsius for #%d day",x+1);
        scanf("%d",&temp[x]);
    }
}
void conv()
{
    int x=0;
    for(x=0;x<d;x++)
    {
        temp[x]=1.8*temp[x]+32;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
it's got some error "malloc should have prototype" how to fix it.. plz –  ViSTA Jun 29 '13 at 16:26
    
@user2534857 edited, check it. Add #include <stdlib.h> –  Immueggpain Jun 29 '13 at 16:30
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