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I have a string from an external library that looks like this:

s = "  things.each do |thing|\n    thing += 5\n    thing.save\n  end\n\n"

This input string isn't going to change. I need to insert it into a file using ERB. e.g.:

erb = ERB.new("<%= s %>")
File.write("test.txt", erb.result(instance_eval('binding'))

My problem is the indentation. Without making any changes to the string, the file will be written like this:

  things.each do |thing|
    thing += 5
    thing.run
  end

Note the indentation. What I want to do, however, is to insert the text uniformly indented another two spaces in, like so:

    things.each do |thing|
      thing += 5
      thing.run
    end

If I do this:

erb = ERB.new("  <%= s %>")

Then only the first line will be indented.

    things.each do |thing|
    thing += 5
    thing.run
  end

I can achieve this by modifying the initial string..

erb = ERB.new("<%= s.gsub(/  (\w)/, "    \\1") %>")

.. but that feels a bit messy. I don't really want to do that in the view. Is there a way to indent the entire string in ERB, or am I out of luck? I think I might be.

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Have you tried this? ERB.new("<%= ' ' + s %>") (that's a 2-space string being prepended). –  lurker Jun 29 '13 at 18:12

1 Answer 1

I don't think that there is any builtin solution for your problem. But this does not mean you shouldn't just build your own :)

Something like this should work:

class CodeIndenter < Struct.new(:code, :indentation)
  def self.indent(*args)
    self.new(*args).indent
  end

  def separator
    "\n"
  end

  def indent
    code.split(separator).map do |line|
      indentation + line
    end.join(separator)
  end
end

s = "  things.each do |thing|\n    thing += 5\n    thing.save\n  end\n\n"
puts CodeIndenter.indent(s, "  ")
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