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I have an application that copies files (via ADB) to an android tablet. It takes some time so I want to display a popup with an indeterminate progress bar on it. When the copy task is complete then I want to be able to stop the progress bar and let the user close the dialog.

At the moment I have not added the extra dialog box and am just trying to get the progress bar working. The problem I have is that the progress bar is not showing at the start of the task, but I dont know why. The progressbar shows when the dialog box saying sync complete appears. The code is:

        progress = new JProgressBar(0, 100);
        progress.setForeground(new Color(255, 99, 71));
        progress.setIndeterminate(true);
        progress.setValue(0);
        progress.setPreferredSize( new Dimension( 300, 20 ) );
        progress.setBounds( 278, 12, 260, 20 );
        progress.setVisible(false);
        progress.setString("Sync in progress");
        progress.setStringPainted(true);
        contentPane.add(progress);
        pushtotab = new JButton("");
        pushtotab.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {


 public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
                        if (buildpathset==1){
                            try{
                            setCursor(Cursor.getPredefinedCursor(Cursor.WAIT_CURSOR));
                            progress.setVisible(true);
                            wiredsync();
                        }finally{
                            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "sync complete. ",null, buildpathset);
                             setCursor(Cursor.getDefaultCursor());      
                             progress.setVisible(false);
                        }}else{ 
    //warning in here later - TO Do
                }
                }
                });

public void wiredsync(){

        try {

                    Process process = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("adb" + " push "+ buildpath + " " + adbtabletsync);
                    InputStreamReader reader = new InputStreamReader(process.getInputStream());
                    Scanner scanner = new Scanner(reader);
                    scanner.close();
                    int exitCode = process.waitFor();
                    System.out.println("Process returned: " + exitCode);

                } catch(IOException e) {
                    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                    e.printStackTrace();
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
    }//end 

Thanks for the help,

Andy

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

pooyan has the right idea -- do the long running process in a background thread -- but gives the wrong library example, since your program is a Swing program and not an Android program. The canonical answer to this for Swing is to do your long-running task in the doInBackground() method of a SwingWorker.

Please hold while I find a better example...

Something like so:

if (buildpathset == 1) {
   setCursor(Cursor.getPredefinedCursor(Cursor.WAIT_CURSOR));
   progress.setVisible(true);

   // create my SwingWorker object
   final SwingWorker<Void, Void> myWorker = new SwingWorker<Void, Void>() {
      protected Void doInBackground() throws Exception {
         // here is my long running task, calling in background
         // thread
         wiredsync();
         return null;
      };
   };

   // this allows me to be notified when the SwingWorker has
   // finished
   myWorker.addPropertyChangeListener(new PropertyChangeListener() {

      @Override
      public void propertyChange(PropertyChangeEvent pcEvt) {
         // if the SwingWorker is done
         if (pcEvt.getNewValue() == SwingWorker.StateValue.DONE) {
            // notify the user
            JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "sync complete. ",
                  null, buildpathset);
            setCursor(Cursor.getDefaultCursor());
            progress.setVisible(false);

            try {
               // one way to catch any errors that occur in
               // SwingWorker
               myWorker.get();
            } catch (InterruptedException | ExecutionException e) {
               e.printStackTrace();
            }

         }
      }
   });
   // run my SwingWorker
   myWorker.execute();
} else {
   // warning in here later - TO Do
}

For more on this, please check out: Lesson: Concurrency in Swing

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Thank you. It worked( although I had to change to JRE7 as i was using 6 and that couldnt handle multiple exception catches. Bit of a faff, but cracked it). Works thanks! –  andy Jun 29 '13 at 17:06
    
@andy: you can stay with JRE6 if you change the catch block into two catch blocks. Glad it worked, but be sure to read the link at the bottom so you can fully understand why it worked. Luck! –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 29 '13 at 17:14

i think your problem is that you don't use thread . I mean after you turn visibility of your progress bar to true , you should define your long task in a thread. I'm Not familiar with Swing But take Look there for Swing (sorry if it's no use full): http://www.java-tips.org/java-se-tips/javax.swing/how-to-handle-long-running-tasks-in-a-swing-applic.html

and there for android :http://www.mkyong.com/android/android-progress-bar-example/

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