Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a toy operating system and bootloader. I'm trying to write the kernel in C, and then convert it to binary for direct jumping to from the bootloader (i.e., I'm not loading an ELF or anything like that).

I've got the linker file setup with the proper origin (I'm loading the kernel to address 0xC0000000) and confirm with objdump that it's using it correctly. However, it's not placing my entry point at the start (0xC0000000) like I wanted. I guess that's not what the ENTRY directive is for.

My problem is simply that I want to place a particular function, kernel_main at address 0xC0000000. Is there a way I can accomplish this using gcc for compiling and linking?

Here is what the relevant parts of my linker file look like:

ENTRY(kernel_main)

SECTIONS
{
   /* Origin */
   . = 0xC0000000;

   .text BLOCK(4K) : ALIGN(4K)
   {
       *(.text)
   }
   /* etc. */
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The ENTRY directive is only useful for output formats that support an entrypoint. Since you're using a binary output, this won't work. What you can do is write a small stub in a separate source file (i.e. entry.c or entry.asm or whatever). Then, in the ld script, before the *(.text) line, you can put entry.o(.text). This instructs ld to load the symbols from a specific object file (whereas * denotes all object files). So the new ld script would look like this: ENTRY(kernel_main)

SECTIONS
{
   /* Origin */
  . = 0xC0000000;

   .text BLOCK(4K) : ALIGN(4K)
   {
       entry.o(.text)
       *(.text)
   }
   /* etc. */
}

As long as entry.o contains just one function (that simply calls your kernel main), this should work.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, thanks. I tested this out and it appears to be working fine. –  sh1ftst0rm Jun 29 '13 at 18:47

The ENTRY linker command tells the linker which symbol the loader should jump to when it loads the program. If you're making your own operating system it's really not used since there is no loader.

Instead, as you know, the program simply starts at the first code address.

To make place a special segment of code first, you could place it in a special code segment, and put it first in the list:

.text BLOCK(4K) : ALIGN(4K)
{
    *(.text.boot) *(.text)
}

The segments in the list is placed in the order they are given.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks that's a good solution. I tested it out and it works fine. The only reason I chose Drew's answer instead if because this relies on compiler specific syntax for assigning a function to a segment. Drew's answer is a little more generic and clean in my opinion, but both appear to work fine. –  sh1ftst0rm Jun 29 '13 at 18:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.