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How do I change the overloaded operator to return a value instead pf a reference?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class IntList 
{ 
private: 
    int list[1]; 
public:
    IntList() {list[0] = 0;}
    int& operator[] (const int index) {return list[index];} 
}; 

int main()
{
    IntList list;

    cout << list[0] << endl;
    list[0] = 1;
    cout << list[0] << endl;
    return 0;
}
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1  
get rid of the & –  aaronman Jun 29 '13 at 18:13
    
That results in list[0] =1; having a compilation error. –  David Tunnell Jun 29 '13 at 18:14
1  
That is because you are trying to assign to a value –  aaronman Jun 29 '13 at 18:15
    
The code is OK. What do you want? –  Immueggpain Jun 29 '13 at 18:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
int operator[] (const int index){}
^^^^^

Just remove the &. Once you do that you cannot use it for assigning values to the array elements.

Difference between returning a reference and a non reference

As you noticed when operator [] returns a reference, it can be used on the left hand side of the assignment. This is possible because when you return by reference the return value of operator [] is an l-value. References are treated as l-values because you can take reference of variables that are stored in memory and have an address.
When operator [] returns by value the expression list[0] = 1; will eventually evaluate[#] to something like,

1=1;

Which is illogical, since 1 is not a l-value, the compiler will generate a diagnostic that the left operand must be a l-value.

[#] Assuming value of the element at subscript 0 is 1:

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Thanks, this results in list[0] = 1; breaking. Can you explain why to me? I am new to c++. –  David Tunnell Jun 29 '13 at 18:15
    
@DavidTunnell: Hope that explains. –  Alok Save Jun 29 '13 at 18:29

You can do this by just removing the &, so you have
int operator[] (const int index){}.
However as you noticed then the problem is that you cannot assign to it without a compilation error because the index operator no longer returns an l-value. So I think you should consider why you want to return a value instead of a reference. It is possible that you want a pattern where the index operator cannot be use to assign to the object, maybe for some sort of read only type object. Your other option is to have a separate function to set it because the index operator can no longer be used to do that

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In your code example you are using assignment, which requires that you return a reference.

list[0] = 1;
list.operator[](0) = 1;
int& xref = list.operator[](0);
(xref) = 1; // <-- changed the value of list element 0.

Given that you want operator[](int index) to return a value, this would translate to:

int x = list.operator[](0);
x = 1; <-- you changed x, not list[0].

If you want operator[](int index) to return a value but also have list[0] = 1 still work, you're going to need to provide two versions of the operator so that the compiler can determine which behavior you are trying to invoke in a given call:

// const member, returns a value.
int operator[] (const int index) const {return list[index];} 

// non const member, which returns a reference to allow n[i] = x;
int& operator[] (const int index) {return list[index];} 

Note that they must differ by both return type AND member-constness.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class IntList 
{ 
private: 
    int list[1]; 
public:
    IntList() {list[0] = 0;}
    int operator[] (const int index) const { return list[index]; }
    int& operator[] (const int index) {return list[index];} 
}; 

int main(int argc, const char** argv)
{
    IntList list;

    cout << list[0] << endl;
    list[0] = 1;
    int x = list[0];
    cout << list[0] << ", " << x << endl;
    return 0;
}

Working demo: http://ideone.com/9UEJND

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