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I have the following problem. In my pandas data frame, I had couple of records (specifically, four of them) that were (unintentionally) duplicated, and I dropped them with drop_duplicates(take_last = True). Now, in one of the columns I have strings that I've been trying to map on integer values using unique_vals, int_representation = np.unique(df.x, return_inverse = True) but I found that for some reason the number of unique strings in my original column, and the number of unique integer values in int_representation is different, which doesn't make any sense.

So, I am going through the original data frame now, trying to understand the reason for that, and what I found is that all of a sudden I am getting an error when accessing the data frame's index where one of the dropped duplicates was located. It's really strange coz, say, df.xs(10) works, df.xs(11) doesn't, and df.xs(12) works again. And this happens exactly four times, for indices corresponding to records that had been removed. I have also checked that when I don't drop, the problem disappears.

I suspect this is why np.unique got confused with its results. Does it make any sense? How to solve this problem? Any help would be much appreciated.

This is the kind of code I'm having:

df_mwe = pd.DataFrame( {'one': [1,2,2,3,4,5], 'two': ['a','b','c','d','d','d']} )
df_mwe
   one two
0    1   a
1    2   b
2    2   c
3    3   d
4    4   d
5    5   d

unique_vals, keys = np.unique( df_mwe['two'], return_inverse = True )

and keys return array([0, 1, 2, 3, 3, 3]), as expected. Now, let's remove duplicates from the first column:

df_mwe = df_mwe.drop_duplicates(cols='one', take_last = True)
df_mwe
   one two
0    1   a
2    2   c
3    3   d
4    4   d
5    5   d

and

unique_vals, keys = np.unique( df_mwe['two'], return_inverse = True )

yields keys equal to array([0, 1, 2, 3, 3]), which is wrong and I suspect it has to do with the fact that index 1 is now missing in the frame.

EDIT: Jeff's answer below aside, adding such line:

df_mwe.index = range(0,np.size(df_mwe['one']))

after dropping duplicates, does the job as well.

share|improve this question
    
can u put up your original frame and code to reproduce? –  Jeff Jun 29 '13 at 20:35
    
Before doing that, is it possible that the reason is that I didn't manually reindex the frame after dropping? –  Simon Righley Jun 29 '13 at 20:42
    
showing your code will help diagnose the problem. you might be working on a copy or doing an operation inplace when u don't expect –  Jeff Jun 29 '13 at 20:50
    
@Jeff, I edited my question. –  Simon Righley Jun 29 '13 at 20:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Pass the series using its .values attribute. Passing a series to a numpy function should be the same as passing the actual underlying array (which is what .values gives you). But since np.unique is opaque it might be doing something which is not obvious.

In [169]: x = df_mwe.drop_duplicates(cols='one', take_last = True)

In [170]: x
Out[170]: 
   one two
0    1   a
2    2   c
3    3   d
4    4   d
5    5   d

In [171]: np.unique(x['two'],return_inverse=True)
Out[171]: 
(two
0        a
1      NaN
2        c
3        d
Name: two, dtype: object,
 array([0, 1, 2, 3, 3]))

In [172]: np.unique(x['two'].values,return_inverse=True)
Out[172]: (array(['a', 'c', 'd'], dtype=object), array([0, 1, 2, 2, 2]))

Here is the pandas way of doing this, FYI (the first return value is the indexer, the 2nd is list of provided indicies that are missing)

In [182]: Index(x['two'].unique()).get_indexer_non_unique(x['two'])
Out[182]: (Int64Index([0, 1, 2, 2, 2], dtype=int64), array([], dtype=int64))
share|improve this answer
    
what are you doing with np.unique? what is your end goal? –  Jeff Jun 29 '13 at 21:22
    
Just wanted to map those strings to integers (I'm calculating some stats on a text, and I need words in a number representation), and was hinted here that what I call keys in my code is an easy way of doing that, which is actually true. –  Simon Righley Jun 29 '13 at 21:25
    
Alternatively to ur solution, adding this line df_mwe.index = range(0,np.size(df_mwe['one'])) to my original mwe does the job too. –  Simon Righley Jun 29 '13 at 21:27
1  
I add the pandas way of doing what you are doing (which actually is an interesting feature) –  Jeff Jun 29 '13 at 21:41
    
Actually, it turned out that for my large data frame, np.unique was still going bananas, even when passing argument with values, as you suggested. I really don't get it why, but only after explicit reindexing ala what I wrote with the range, it started to work properly. –  Simon Righley Jun 29 '13 at 22:45

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