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Here is my problem, I have a text in PHP :

$text = "Car is going with 10 meters/second"

$find = array("meters","meters/second");

now when I do this :

 foreach ($find as $f)
   {
     $count = substr_count($text,$f);
    } 

The output is :

meters -> 1
meters/second -> 1 

Normally I consider meters/second as a whole word, so meters shouldn't be counted, only meters/second since no space seperates them

Thus What I Expect :

meters -> 0
meters/second -> 1
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why should it be 0 for meters? it does appear in text... –  Guillaume Jun 29 '13 at 21:12
1  
meters is also there. Then why 0 for it? –  kushpf Jun 29 '13 at 21:12
    
You're doing it with substr. if you're asking for finding only whole word, please a bit search :) –  Ahmet Mehmet Jun 29 '13 at 21:13
    
Normally I consider meters/second as a whole word, so meters shouldn't be counted, only meters/second since no space seperates them –  Faouzi Nikolaic Jun 29 '13 at 21:14
    
@FaouziNikolaic stop searching for meters then... –  Guillaume Jun 29 '13 at 21:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do it with a regular expression, \b won't work because / is a word boundary, but something like that should work:

preg_match_all(",meters([^/]|$),", $text, $matches);
print_r($matches[0]);
share|improve this answer
    
this works great only with meters it returns 0, but for seconds alone it returns 1. while also for seconds alone it should be 0 –  Faouzi Nikolaic Jun 29 '13 at 22:37
$exists = preg_match("/\bmeters\b/", $text) ;

\b stands for word boundary.

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that doesn't works because / is a word boundary –  Guillaume Jun 29 '13 at 21:36

To do what you want, you will have to use regular expressions. Something like:

$text = "Car is going with 10 meters/second";
$find = array("/\bmeters\b/", "/\bmeters\/second\b/");

foreach($find as $f) {
    print(preg_match_all($f, $text));
}
share|improve this answer
    
that doesn't works because / is a word boundary –  Guillaume Jun 29 '13 at 21:36
    
It does work because it is escaped with the \. I tested it and it got the results which the OP desired. –  J David Smith Jun 30 '13 at 0:48

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