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What I'm trying to achieve is a set of elements (boxes) with a link inside. This link should be on the bottom right, but the vertical-align property is not working

What it looks like

jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/4JMav/

HTML

<ul>
    <li><a href="#">TEST 1</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">TEST 2</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">TEST 3</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">TEST 4</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">TEST 5</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">TEST 6</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">TEST 7</a></li>
</ul>

CSS

ul li
{
    display: inline-table;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    margin: 5px;
    border: 1px solid black;
}
ul li a
{
    text-align: right;
    vertical-align: bottom;
    display: block;
    height: 100%;
    padding: 10px;
}

I also tried several combinations of vertical-align and absolute positioning, also using wrappers around the a-element, with no effort yet.

Question

How can I position the link on the bottom right, while still expanding the a-element over the entire square?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Vertical-align works only with table-cell:

ul li a {
text-align: right;
vertical-align: bottom;
display: table-cell;
height: 100%;
padding: 10px;
}

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/4JMav/8/

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I would place the text inside a span, and then position that span absolute inside the a. Yhis would make it easy to set it to the bottom right.

Your css would look something like this:

ul li {
    display: inline-block;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    margin: 5px;
    border: 1px solid black;
}
ul li a {
    display: block;
    height: 100%;
    position: relative;
}
ul li a span {
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 10px;
    right: 10px;
}

and an example: http://jsfiddle.net/E2kfd/

share|improve this answer
    
I personally don't like to introduce extra mark-up just for alignment. –  Andy G Jun 29 '13 at 21:49
1  
@AndyG Agreed, but the asker clearly stated he wanted his links to occupy the entire li (which makes sense), and that is not the case in your answer. I am not a big fan of the display: table-... css, so this is IMO the correct way to go then... –  Pevara Jun 29 '13 at 22:04
    
@PeterVT Good points ;) –  Andy G Jun 29 '13 at 22:11

Here is one way, using positioning:

ul li
{
    display: inline-table;
    position: relative;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    margin: 5px;
    border: 1px solid black;
}
ul li a
{
    text-align: right;
    display: inline-block;
    padding: 10px;
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0; right: 0;
}

Personally, though, I would probably give give the ul display: inline-table and use table-cell for the li's.

jsfiddle

share|improve this answer

You need the following change:

ul li a
{
    ...
    display: table-cell;
    ...
}

(Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/4JMav/6/)

Vertical-align works differently for table cells and anything else: for the first, it aligns the content, for the other, it aligns the text content of the element in the line box. If you place a block into a (inline-) table, the CSS renderer generates the anonymous table cell with default vertical aligning and places the block in it. But when you convert the inner element itself into the table cell, it applies the vertical align you set.

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