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I have a user-programming scenario where user can end up creating two observables that depend on each other. RxJS does not allow cyclic dependencies, as far as I can see, the memory or stack reaches its limits and the onError callback is triggered with the value TRUE. However, I would like to detect the cyclic dependency explicitly and throw an more descriptive error message.

Any suggestions as to how to do that?

This codes illustrates how to create a cyclic dependency in RxJS:

var obs = {};
obs.a = Rx.Observable.returnValue(42).combineLatest(obs.b, function (a, b) {
    return a + b;
});
obs.b = Rx.Observable.returnValue(42).combineLatest(obs.a, function (b, a) {
    return b + a;
});

obs.a.subscribe(function(val) {
    console.log(val);
},
function(err) {
    console.error(err);
},
function() {
    console.log("completed");
});

The error message is simply "true".

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

FWIW, the code above isn't actually a cyclic dependency as written. At the time you define obs.a, obs.b is undefined and so what you've really done is call combineLatest(undefined, function ...). So the error you are seeing is because you are passing undefined to combinedLatest(). Admittedly the error message sort of sucks, but we can't do much about that :)

It actually takes some effort to create a real cyclic dependency. If you use defer, then you would have a true cyclic dependency:

var obs = {};
var aRef = Rx.Observable.defer(function () { return obs.a; });
var bRef = Rx.Observable.defer(function () { return obs.b; });
obs.a = Rx.Observable.returnValue(42).combineLatest(bRef, function (a, b) {
        return a + b;
});
obs.b = Rx.Observable.returnValue(42).combineLatest(aRef, function (b, a) {
    return b + a;
});

Now that is a real cyclic dependency. Unfortunately you still get the same error, though with a much deeper stack trace.

There is no fool-proof way to detect cycles. You could wrap the observables in a new observable and detect recursive calls to your subscribe method. But such an algorithm would be defeated if the underlying observables are using subscribeOn or publish or concat anything else that delays the actual cyclic subscriptions.

The best suggestion I have is to append a catchException clause that checks if the error is true and replaces it with a better error:

var obs = {};
var aRef = Rx.Observable.defer(function () { return obs.a; });
var bRef = Rx.Observable.defer(function () { return obs.b; });
obs.a = Rx.Observable.returnValue(42).combineLatest(bRef, function (a, b) {
        return a + b;
}).catchException(function (e) {
    return Rx.Observable.throwException(e === true ? new Error("Invalid, possibly cyclic observables") : e);
});
obs.b = Rx.Observable.returnValue(42).combineLatest(aRef, function (b, a) {
    return b + a;
}).catchException(function (e) {
    return Rx.Observable.throwException(e === true ? new Error("Invalid, possibly cyclic observables") : e);
});

Here is a jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/bman654/ZWVF2/1/

Of course, if you are letting the users actually type in observables, not making them cyclic seems to be a concept they need to understand. If you are building some sort of point and click interface to making the observables, then maybe you can make the interface prevent this sort of thing.

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You are of course right, there was no cyclic dependency. Thanks for the answer! –  Egil Hansen Jul 1 '13 at 14:12
    
Here is a outline of a solution I came up with: jsfiddle.net/xGhnC ... it uses the classic spreadsheet algorithm for detecting cyclic dependencies. As far as I can see, it should not cause problems with subscribeOn, publish, or concat. Am I right? –  Egil Hansen Jul 1 '13 at 14:17
1  
Oh yeah if you can wrap the actual create methods of the observables, then your method will work because you are detecting cyclic dependencies in the "build" step. Here is a minor tweak to ensure your state variables get reset if an error occurs: jsfiddle.net/bman654/xGhnC/2 However, I can still defeat your check by using defer: jsfiddle.net/bman654/xGhnC/3 (notice no error when I call a() to create my observable and then if I subscribe, we get your original problem. –  Brandon Jul 1 '13 at 14:33
    
Cool, thanks. Wondering why you add try/finally. If there is a cyclic dependency, I dont need to recover. I am converting from a DSL, so I can prevent stuff like defer. –  Egil Hansen Jul 1 '13 at 17:59
1  
ah if you do not need to recover then yes you probably do not need the try/finally. –  Brandon Jul 1 '13 at 18:03
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