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For a computer to simulate a system of n particles in an universe where they interact with each other, one could use this rough algorithm:

for interval where dt=10ms
  for each particle a in universe
    for each particle b in universe
      interact(a,b,dt)
  for each particle a in universe
    integrate(a,dt)

It is heavy, calling interact n^2 times per tick - thus, unfeasible to simulate many particles. Most of the time, though, particles that are near interact less strongly. The idea is to take advantage of this fact, creating a graph where each node is a particle and each connection is their distance. Particles that are near interact more often than particles that are far. For example,

for interval where dt=10ms
  for each particle a in universe
    for each particle b where 0m <= distance to a < 10m
      interact(a,b,dt)
for interval where dt=20ms
  for each particle a in universe
    for each particle b where 10m <= distance to a < 20m
      interact(a,b,dt)
for interval where dt=40ms
  fro each particle a in universe
    for each particle a in b where 20m <= distance to a < 40m
      interact(a,b,dt)
(...etc)
for interval where dt=10ms
  for each particle a in universe
    integrate(a,dt)   

This would be obviously superior, as a particle would interact mostly with those which are near. When a particle that is far gets closer, it will start refreshing more frequently.

I need to know the math behind this, in order to calculate the optimal refresh rate between 2 particles in function of distance. Thus, my question is, what is the formal name of what I am describing here?

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3 Answers 3

To overcome the O(n^2) cost of calculating the full set of pair-wise interactions at each step, N-body simulations of this kind are often implemented using the Barnes-Hut approach. This is similar in spirit to the type of multi-resolution idea that you've described.

Barnes-Hut is an efficient (O(n*log(n))) approximation for the full pair-wise interaction terms based on a hierarchical spatial partitioning strategy. The set of particles are inserted into an octree (quadtree in R^2), which is a spatial indexing tree with height O(log(n)). In addition to containing pointers to their children, nodes at each level of the tree also contain the center of mass of their set of child particles - tree nodes are in effect lumped "super-particles" at various spatial resolutions.

When calculating the force acting on a particular particle the tree is traversed from the root, and at each node a decision is made whether to continue traversing into it's children, or just take the approximate 'lumped' contribution based on the center of mass of the children. Typically, this decision is made based on the distance of the center of mass from the particle in question - if the center of mass is "far enough away" the traversal terminates and the "lumped" approximation is taken.

This strategy ensures that the full (and expensive) pair-wise interaction is only computed at "short" particle distances, with approximate "lumped" interactions used as the distance increases.

State-of-the-art N-body algorithms also incorporate individual (and variable) time-steps for each particle in the system to gain additional efficiency, but this starts to get very complicated!

Hope this helps.

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Well, thanks. While this is not the algorithm I'm idealizing, this is still an insightful answer as I didn't know those details about the lumping strategy you described. –  Viclib Jun 30 '13 at 4:29
    
+1 for mentioning variable time steps. As you say, it gets very complicated, but if you want an accurate simulation, it can't be avoided. Even if you want an "accurate looking" simulation - one which doesn't give the correct positions but is indicative of what sort of things happen - you will have to deal with this in some form. Basically the rounding errors tend to accumulate to overstate the total energy of the system (at least when it is an increase when I do it) and systems which should be gravitationally bound still end up "blowing up". This is a hard problem to solve well. –  Peter Webb Jun 30 '13 at 13:02

You're doing time-step simulation, and using a performance enhancing heuristic called localization.

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The general algorithm you describe is a N-body simulation.

I don't think the heuristic you describe has a universal name.

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