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Consider the following SELECT statement where I get different counts from licensee & licensee_type tables and am getting the results that I want.

SELECT
    licensee.license_type_id,
    COUNT(*) AS count_all,
    COUNT(CASE WHEN licensee.citizen = 'US' THEN 1 ELSE NULL END) AS count_a,
    COUNT(CASE WHEN licensee.citizen = 'Other' AND licensee.flag = 'Y' THEN 1 ELSE NULL END) AS count_b,
    COUNT(CASE WHEN licensee.flag = 'N' THEN 1 ELSE NULL END) AS count_c
FROM licensee
INNER JOIN license_type ON licensee.license_type_id = license_type.id
GROUP BY licensee.license_type_id;

Scenario: The main table 'licensee' is split into two tables say 'licensee_us' and 'licensee_other' based on the column 'citizen'. Both the new tables doesn't have 'citizen' column. Table 'licensee_us' has records from 'licensee' table (citizen= 'US') & similarly table 'licensee_other' has records from 'licensee' table (citizen = 'Other') & both the tables has the JOIN-ing column 'license_type_id' & column 'flag'.

Now, What's the EFFICIENT way to get the same counts as the above SELECT query with the new two tables GROUP-ed by license_type_id? Let me know if any clarification needed. I am really looking for an 'EFFICIENT' way to do this. Something other than having to use UNION, if there is any.

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2 Answers 2

I expect the most efficient way would be to use UNION ALL to re-combine the two tables and do the query exactly as you have it. For some reason I get the feeling that's not what you want to hear:

    SELECT
        licensee.license_type_id,
        COUNT(*) AS count_all,
        COUNT(CASE WHEN licensee.citizen = 'US' THEN 1 ELSE NULL END) AS count_a,
        COUNT(CASE WHEN licensee.citizen = 'Other' AND licensee.flag = 'Y' THEN 1 ELSE NULL END) AS count_b,
        COUNT(CASE WHEN licensee.flag = 'N' THEN 1 ELSE NULL END) AS count_c
    FROM 
(select 'US' as citizen, licensee_us.* UNION ALL SELECT 'Other' as citizen, licensee_other.* ) as licensee
    INNER JOIN license_type ON licensee.license_type_id = license_type.id
    GROUP BY licensee.license_type_id;

You can try a bunch of sub-selects but I don't think they'd be particularly efficient. You know your data though so it might be worth a try.

Why are you splitting them out? I'm not saying you should not do this if it makes sense but perhaps keeping the same table structure and having views to filter the US & Others out for use in other scenarios is the way to go.

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Altering Table structure is beyond my control or the scope of this question. UNION ALL is what i thought too & also for some reason i don't feel like its the most efficient way. Sorry, i should have mentioned that in my original question. –  Bala Jun 30 '13 at 0:20
    
You will need to actually try the various solutions but I'd just do this to get around the changing table structure and deal with performance/efficiency should the need arise. You really do want counts across the union of two tables so it's hardly an unreasonable approach. –  LoztInSpace Jun 30 '13 at 0:23
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maybe try to group by licensee.license_type_id , citizen , flag ?

SELECT licensee.license_type_id, COUNT(*) AS count_all , count(decode(licensee.flag,'N',null) as count_c FROM licensee INNER JOIN license_type ON licensee.license_type_id = license_type.id GROUP BY licensee.license_type_id , licensee.citizen , licensee.flag;

if there are more distinct values in the licensee.citizen columns , filter them in the WHERE clause. this way you will get all of the wanted counts in a different way , you can use unpivot if you want to re-arrange them , notice the count_c column , decode is just a different syntax to the case clause.

I hope it helped you , enjoy :)

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