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I am trying to write a script to install some packages all at once. The catch is, I'm using sage (http://www.sagemath.org), which is like an extension of python. When I'm in a terminal, all I do is type:

/Applications/sage/sage -sh #to get into sage shell
easy_install -U distribute #to install package
exit #to get out of sage shell

However, when I write these commands into a shell script then it opens the sage shell and waits. When I exit, it then goes onto the next command of installing distribute. How do I get it to run the easy_install command within the sage shell?

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2 Answers 2

Assuming the man page or other documentation to sage doesn't specifically address this issue, AND that you're using a unix/linux/cygwin(ish) shell, you may find that here-documents will feed the cmds from the script to sage. Try

#!/bin/bash

 #to get into sage shell
/Applications/sage/sage -sh <<EOS
    easy_install -U distribute #to install package
    exit #to get out of sage shell
EOS

You can also use #!/bin/ksh or #!/bin/sh and others as the 'she-bang' line that is always the first line of a shell script. You'll need to made the script file executable, with

 chmod 755 ./mySageTalkerScript.sh

And either include the path to the script in your PATH variable, or by providing a relative path (as shown in the chmod cmd), or the full path, i.e.

/path/to/script/mySageTalkerScript.sh

As you indicate that there is more to code, AND if you're following good practices by indenting the code, and you use tabs for indents, they you can indent the the whole block with

 #to get into sage shell
    /Applications/sage/sage -sh <<-EOS
        easy_install -U distribute #to install package
        exit #to get out of sage shell
     EOS

Note the '-' char now added in between <<-EOS. If you don't use -EOS, you'll have to be sure that the closing EOS is at the left margin. In either case you'll need to ensure EOS is the only thing on the line. And finally, EOS can be any string, some people use !, but I find using an abbreviation like EndOfScript, EndOfData (EOS, EOD), to be less confusing.

If sage doesn't respond to this, try removing the -sh, or look for other cmd-line options that make sense for this context. It may be (and I would consider this a bug), that sage doesn't read from std-in (which is what a here-document is using). The most basic test to see if sage can read from std-in would be echo exit | sage -sh.

IHTH.

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I can confirm that this works to get easy_install to work via a script for Sage shell (which, after all is just a normal shell, so there's no reason for it not to work). –  kcrisman Jul 1 '13 at 2:54

the sage shell is a process running in the foreground and due to the sequential nature of your script, the sage shell has to finish running before the next line of the script is executed. It is after the sage shell exits that the easy_install line is run. The script is performing as written.

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I agree, but the question I'm asking is how to get it to run the way I want it to. –  Chris Jun 30 '13 at 3:54

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