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I've done all of my programming in Matlab until recently when I decided to learn free-form Fortran. I use the gfortran compiler with Cygwin. I'm interested in writing functions that can take an array as an input, do calculations on it, and then pass a new array back out. I never thought this was a difficult task, but it has sure proven to be one at least for me anyway. Here's my simple test code:

    PROGRAM RETURN_ARRAY
! Description: This program is used to test a function that returns
!              an array.

    REAL*8 :: NROOT

    PRINT *, NROOT(2, [1.0D0, 4.0D0, 9.0D0, 16.0D0, 25.0D0])

END PROGRAM RETURN_ARRAY


FUNCTION NROOT(N, X) RESULT(Y)
! Description: This function calculates the Nth root of a real number
!              or array of real numbers.
!
! Inputs: N - desired Nth root
!         X - real number or array of real numbers to take Nth root of
!
! Outputs: Y - Nth root of real number or array of real numbers, X

    INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: N
    REAL*8, INTENT(IN)  :: X(:)
    REAL*8              :: P
    REAL*8              :: Y(SIZE(X))

    P = 1.0D0/N
    Y = X**P

END FUNCTION NROOT

`I compile this program and internal function as follows:

gfortran RETURN_ARRAY.f90 -o MAIN.exe

The program compiles without error. However, when I try to run the program, I get this output in the terminal:

Segmentation fault (core dumped)

I would appreciate any help in resolving this issue. Thanks in advance.

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1 Answer

When I tried compiling (gfortran 4.8 on Fedora 18), I first got an error that reads

Warning: Type mismatch in argument 'n' at (1); passed REAL(8) to INTEGER(4)

So there is the first error. Changing the 2.d0 to 2, I get the following error

Error: Procedure 'nroot' at (1) with assumed-shape dummy argument 'x' must have an explicit interface

So here is another error. Simply using a contains structure (see below), I get the following result:

   1.0000000000000000        2.0000000000000000        3.0000000000000000        4.0000000000000000        5.0000000000000000

So it seems your problem is two-fold: you are incorrectly matching variable types & incorrectly declaring a function. The following is what your code should look like (sans comments):

PROGRAM RETURN_ARRAY
    PRINT *, NROOT(2, [1.0D0, 4.0D0, 9.0D0, 16.0D0, 25.0D0])
  CONTAINS
    FUNCTION NROOT(N, X) RESULT(Y)
       INTEGER, INTENT(IN) :: N
       REAL*8, INTENT(IN)  :: X(:)
       REAL*8              :: P
       REAL*8              :: Y(SIZE(X))

       P = 1.0D0/N
       Y = X**P

    END FUNCTION NROOT
END PROGRAM RETURN_ARRAY

EDIT

As an aside, I have two other suggestions:

(1) It is bad practice to use REAL*8 as it is compiler and/or system dependent. You should use INTEGER, PARAMETER :: dp = SELECTED_REAL_KIND(14, 100) (here 14 signifies the number of significant decimal places and 100 represents the maximal exponent). You would then define variables as REAL(dp) :: P or REAL(KIND=dp) :: P and P = 1.0_dp/N.

(2) You should declare IMPLICIT NONE after PROGRAM <name>. This way, any variables that are not explicitly declared halt the compiler.

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Thanks kyle. I appreciate your help. I've added more to my reply below. –  Stephen Jun 30 '13 at 2:36
    
I tried to add a more detailed response to your answer but apparently I have to have a reputation of at least 10 to add an answer to my own question. I am aware of the CONTAINS structure but using this requires that the function be internal. My attached program is just a test. I'm interested in eventually using the function external to the main program in which case the CONTAINS structure wouldn't work. –  Stephen Jun 30 '13 at 3:09
1  
@Stephen Make the function a module procedure (put it after the CONTAINS statement in a module) and then USE the module in the main program (or in future in any other program unit that needs to reference the function). –  IanH Jun 30 '13 at 5:30
1  
REAL*8 isn't compiler or system dependent, it's an 8-byte real REAL(8) is compiler/system dependent. (personal rant: I hate the kind crap, and find the selected_real_kind annoying, so I either use the star notation, or for newer Fortran code I just use ISO_FORTRAN_ENV and then declare real(kind=real64)) –  steabert Jun 30 '13 at 9:33
    
@steabert: you are right, I always confuse those two options since I never use them; I always use dp as I defined it. I rarely delve into ISO_FORTRAN_ENV or ISO_C_BINDING, so I am far less familiar with those. –  Kyle Kanos Jun 30 '13 at 15:03
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