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I have been working on integrating Facebook Login with my website, and so far I've been succeeding for the most part; however, I still have few doubts.

On my homepage; I have a button an a href that will trigger a Javascript function that will prompt the user with a pop-up window to login to Facebook; if it's the first time, the user will be prompted with another pop-up window that asks for permissions!

After the user logs in (and accepts permission); (s)he will be redirected to another page using document.location.href; so far, everything is working perfectly. What I would like to do next however, is the following:

I would like to - upon loading the page in which the user is redirected to - display a welcome message (Welcome [email]) - then I would like to generate few elements on the fly (dynamically) depending on some database information attached to the username.

I am trying to do that in Javascript:

<script>
$('document').ready(function(){

window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
    FB.init({
    appId   : '[my app id]',
    oauth   : true,
    status  : true, // check login status
    cookie  : true, // enable cookies to allow the server to access the session
    xfbml   : true // parse XFBML
    });

    $(document).trigger('fbload');
};

$(document).on('fbload', function(){
    FB.getLoginStatus(function(response) {
        if (response.status === 'connected') {
            FB.api('/me', function(response) {
            user_email = response.email; //get user email
            // Here, I can display the welcome message :)
            });
        } else if (response.status === 'not_authorized') {
            // the user is logged in to Facebook,
            // but has not authenticated your app
        } else {
            // the user isn't logged in to Facebook.
            }
        });
    });
});
</script>

This code works just fine :) - However, if I remove the FB.getLoginStatus from the function, which will result in the following code:

$(document).on('fbload', function(){
    FB.api('/me', function(response) {
    console.log(response);
    user_email = response.email; //get user email
    console.log(user_email);
    // Here, I can display the welcome message :)
});

I get the following output for user_email:

undefined

I cannot seem to get the logic of that! Since FB.getLoginStatus only checks if the user is logged in or not; why does it (or the lack of it) disrupt the function call FB.api?

I would be grateful if someone could explains the logic of what's actually happening here!

Note: I may end up using FB.getLoginStatus anyway, but I am mainly concerned about the logic of what's happening!

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1 Answer 1

Your FB.api('/me', function(response) { function can't work without active access token which is provided by FB.getLoginStatus(function(response) { function.

You can see that in your browser's console by changing code into:

    $(document).on('fbload', function(){
        FB.getLoginStatus(function(response) {
            console.log(response);  //CHANGE
                FB.api('/me', function(response) {
                    user_email = response.email; //get user email
                    console.log(response);  //CHANGE
                });
            });
        });

That is because FB.api('/me', function(response) { is asking for various data about current FB user (name, gender, hometown, education, username, quotes...), so Facebook is just making sure you have that user logged in into your application.

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1  
But isn't response in user_email = response.email coming from the response here: FB.api('/me', function(response)...? –  Thuglife Jun 30 '13 at 0:24
    
I am sorry, you are absolutely right. Real answer is: your FB.api('/me', function(response) { can't work without active access token which is provided by FB.getLoginStatus. You can examine that closely in your browser console by changing your code with: $(document).on('fbload', function(){ FB.getLoginStatus(function(response) { console.log(response); FB.api('/me', function(response) { user_email = response.email; //get user email console.log(response); }); }); }); –  ObiVanKaPudji Jun 30 '13 at 1:54
    
Thanks; I am still interested in knowing how which is provided by FB.getLoginStatus is actually happening? I don't see FB.api taking any arguments from FB.getLoginStatus and this part is where I would like to get some clarification about! –  Thuglife Jun 30 '13 at 1:59
    
Use code I provided you in edited answer to examine first and second response. You should see that first response has userId, accessToken, signedRequest and expiresIn. My guess is that FB.api is using userId and accessToken stored in browser and checking it against Facebook's database for consistency. You can also remove FB.getLoginStatus (and first console.log(response), and see in console error message which says: "An active access token must be used to query information about the current user." –  ObiVanKaPudji Jun 30 '13 at 2:06
1  
Thanks :) - I'm still interested in the stored in browser part! I would like for someone to clarify (and affirm) this; and how it works! –  Thuglife Jun 30 '13 at 2:10

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