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function longestWord(string) {
    var str = string.split(" ");
    var longest = 0;
    var word = null;
    for (var i = 0; i < str.length - 1; i++) {
        if (longest < str[i].length) {
            longest = str[i].length;
            word = str[i];
        }
    }
    return word;
}

When I call longestWord("Pride and Prejudice"), it returns 'Pride' and not 'Prejudice' which is the longest word... why? I checked some other similar questions, but the solutions looked a lot like my code.

share|improve this question
    
don't name an array of strings str –  aaronman Jun 30 '13 at 3:18

12 Answers 12

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That's because you're not comparing all the items in the array, you leave out the last one.

for (var i = 0; i < str.length - 1; i++)

should be

for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++)

or

for (var i = 0; i <= str.length - 1; i++)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! The second solution is what I was trying to do, but I missed out the equal sign. –  bard Jun 30 '13 at 3:26
    
I would personally recommend the first solution for readability to others. The second one takes longer to write and would be less efficient if not for compiler optimizations (recalculating str.length-1 each time, but compilers don't do dumb things like that these days) so real world code would not use the second solution, in my experience. –  coder543 Jun 30 '13 at 4:17

You have a -1 in your condition, it never even scans it:

for (var i = 0; i < str.length - 1; i++) {

Should be:

for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/LfgFk/

share|improve this answer

The index is going up to str.length -1:

for (var i = 0; i < str.length - 1; i++) {

So the last word is not processed.

Try with: longestWord("Pride AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA and Prejudice"). You'll see it works (returns AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA).

In case you're in doubt, the simplest way to fix it is removing the -1 from the for loop.

for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {

Check a demo with both versions (the problematic and the fixed): link here.

share|improve this answer

Here this is your solution with a forEach, this will help you avoid the error in the future

function longestWord(string) {
    var str = string.split(" ");
    var longest = 0;
    var word = null;
    str.forEach(function(str) {
        if (longest < str.length) {
            longest = str.length;
            word = str;
        }
    });
    return word;
}
console.log(longestWord("pride and prejudice"));

Your original problem was just the str.length - 1 should have just been str.length, originally you wouldn't have gotten to the last element of the array

share|improve this answer
for (var i = 0; i < str.length - 1; i++)

to

for (var i = 0; i <= str.length - 1; i++)

OR

for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++)
share|improve this answer

One advantage to taking a functional approach to such problems is that you don't even have to keep count:

function longer(champ, contender) {
  return (contender.length > champ.length) ? contender: champ;
}

function longestWord(str) {
    var words = str.split(' ');
    return words.reduce(longer);
}

See MDN Array.reduce for more info. (note: reduce needs shim for IE8)

share|improve this answer

ForEach is faster in FF but slower in Chrome, but for loop with the cached length and function apply/call is quite faster in both FF and chrome.

Hope the below code helps:

function getLongest (arrStr) {
  var longest = 0, word;

  for(var i=0 , len = arrStr.length ; i < len ; i++){

    if(longest < arrStr[i].length) {
      longest =arrStr[i].length;
      word = arrStr[i];
    }

  }

  return word;
}

function isLongest (str) {
  var arrayStr = str.split(' ');
  return function(fn) {
    return fn.apply(this,[arrayStr]);
  }
}

isLongest("hello aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa bbb")(getLongest); //aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
share|improve this answer

Is there a specific reason

for (var i = 0; i < str.length - 1; i++)

isn't

for (var i = 0; i < str.length - 1; i++)

That seems like it could be the cause.

share|improve this answer
5  
am I losing my mind or are these two identical –  aaronman Jun 30 '13 at 3:27
    
@aaronman LOL. Since the answer's been accepted I won't edit it. :) –  Zong Zheng Li Jun 30 '13 at 4:06

You need to use:

for (var i=0;i<=str.length - 1; i++)

That way it will scan the entire phrase

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Thanks everyone, this is the fixed code:

function longestWord(string) {
    var str = string.split(" ");
    var longest = 0;
    var word = null;
    for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
        var checkedLetters = "";
        for (var j = 0; j < str[i].length; j++) {
            if (/[a-zA-Z]/.test(str[i][j])) {
                checkedLetters += str[i][j];
            }
        if (longest < checkedLetters.length) {
            longest = checkedLetters.length;
            word = checkedLetters;
            }
        }
    }
    return word;
}
share|improve this answer

This seems to be the easiest way to do this.

function longestWord(string) {
    var str = string.split(" ");
    var longest = 0;
    var word = null;

    str.forEach(function(str) {
        if (longest < str.length) {
            longest = str.length;
            word = str;
        }
    });

return word;

}

share|improve this answer

You can simplify your code with a library like Lo-Dash:

function longestWord(string) {
    var words = string.split(' ');
    return _.max(words, function(word) { return word.length; });
}
share|improve this answer

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