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See edit at end for actual problem.

Ok, I have this scenario:

a = [false, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, false, true, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false]

Then if I do this:

a.sort(function(a,b){return !a && b});

It gives me this:

[false, false, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, false, true, false, false, false, false, false, false, true, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false]

It's sorta doing a sort... but not quite... :(

How do I sort this array?

EDIT:

If you are wondering why I did not use just a.sort() is because my actual array is of objects, not a plain array like the one I posted. The real one has elements that look like [{xx:true},{xx:false},...]

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If I do a.map(function(x){ return x?1:0 }).sort(function(a,b){return a>b}); does not work either... I think I might be doing something elementary wrong –  PCoelho Jun 30 '13 at 5:25
    
why you need to write custom function? a.sort() should work –  Haseeb Asif Jun 30 '13 at 5:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted
a = [false, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, false, true, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false, false];


a.sort(function(x, y) {
    return (x === y)? 0 : x? -1 : 1;
});

console.log(a);

JSFiddle

You must return 0 when a and b both have same value, -1 if a is true and 1 otherwise.

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Yep you got it :) thanks! (i'll accept your answer as soon as stackoverflow allows me to :P) –  PCoelho Jun 30 '13 at 5:31
4  
Even shorter: a.sort(function(x, y) { return y - x }); –  Joe Frambach Jun 30 '13 at 5:33
2  
what about a.sort() ? ed: tried, works! –  dandavis Jun 30 '13 at 5:33
    
the array that I am sorting is not as simple as the one I posted. Check my edit –  PCoelho Jun 30 '13 at 5:38
    
@PCoelho, consider using Joe's solution. It works and is more concise. –  c.P.u1 Jun 30 '13 at 5:41

a simpler way:

a = [{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false},{xx:true},{xx:false}];

a.sort(function(a,b){return a.xx-b.xx});

console.log(a);

you can call a.reverse() after the sort() if you want it sorted the other way..

EDIT: edited to reflect updated question of sorting an array of objects instead of an array of booleans.

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Yeah, what's wrong with a.sort(), OP? –  Pranav N. Jun 30 '13 at 5:38
1  
@PranavNegandhi: what's wrong is that i answered the question before an edit re-defined it... –  dandavis Jun 30 '13 at 5:42
    
updated the answer anyway, so people can cut-and-paste a test... –  dandavis Jun 30 '13 at 5:54

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