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I have a class with many methods and a private readonly bool field called _isLoaded with its coresponding property: public bool IsLoaded:

class MyClass
{
    readonly bool _isLoaded;
    public bool IsLoaded
    {
        get { return _isLoaded; }
    }

    public void Method1()
    {
        //does whatever
    }

    public void Method2()
    {
        //does another thing
    }

    public void Load()
    {
        //does a lot of things and then...
        _isLoaded = true;
    }
}

I know there are object invariant methods that assure that after invoking any public method, certain objects still remain in a consistent state. Like, if I added this to my class:

[ContractInvariantMethod]
void checkState()
{
    Contract.Invariant(!_isLoaded);
}

now, my problem is: is there a way to tell the runtime not to invoke the method annotated with ContractInvariantMethod for just one specific public method (in my case, Load), so I could be sure that only that one method would be changing the state of my field?

(Or some other way to achieve the same end)

Thanks.

Edit:
@Liel
Thanks a lot for the answer!
This pattern works perfectly when we have only one field to worry about. I also added this contract postcondition:

public abstract class BaseMyClass
{
    private bool _isLoaded;
    public bool IsLoaded
    {
        get { return _isLoaded; }
    }
    public virtual void Load()
    {
        Contract.Ensures(IsLoaded);
        _isLoaded = true;
    }
}

public class MyClass : BaseMyClass
{
    public override void Load()
    {
        //does a lot of things and then...
        base.Load();
    }
}

Unfortunately, the static checker isn't smart enough to figure out I have to call base.Load() to fulfill the postcondition. It suggests I could just Contract.Assume(IsLoaded)... Apparently, The static checker is far from perfect.

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If my answer was helpful, you can always Accept it as an answer or at least vote-up to show your appreciation. :) –  Liel Jun 30 '13 at 8:19

2 Answers 2

If I understand what you want to achieve, you can use the Contract.OldValue() construct:

public class MyClass
{
    bool _isLoaded;

    public bool IsLoaded
    {
        get { return _isLoaded; }
    }

    public void Method1()
    {
        Contract.Ensures(this._isLoaded == Contract.OldValue(this._isLoaded));
        //does whatever
        _isLoaded = false;
    }

    public void Method2()
    {
        Contract.Ensures(this._isLoaded == Contract.OldValue(this._isLoaded));
        //does another thing
    }

    public void Load()
    {
        //does a lot of things and then...
        _isLoaded = true;
    }
}

When you compile this, you'll get the following warning:

CodeContracts: ensures unproven: this._isLoaded == Contract.OldValue(this._isLoaded)
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I thought Contract.OldValue was for parameters not fields. But if that's really a good design, I think I'd go with that. Because it's a simpler solution that doesn't require a base class to implement, and because it would work with an arbitrary number of fields. Can anyone say if this is really a good option? –  user2212990 Jul 2 '13 at 9:23
    
I think it's perfectly allowable to use it with fields or properties; for an example, see "Contract Abbreviator Methods" on page 15. The rules just state that "... an old expression must refer to a value that existed in the method's pre-state, i.e., it must be an expression that can be evaluated as long as the method's precondition holds." –  Stephen J. Anderson Jul 2 '13 at 10:08
    
That should have been page 15 of the User Manual, sorry :) –  Stephen J. Anderson Jul 2 '13 at 12:02

You can try the following approach:

public class BaseMyClass
{
    private bool _isLoaded;
    public bool IsLoaded
    {
        get { return _isLoaded; }
    }
    public virtual void Load()
    {
        _isLoaded = true;
    }
}

public class MyClass : BaseMyClass
{
    public void Method1()
    {
        //does whatever
    }

    public override void Load()
    {
        //does a lot of things and then...
        base.Load();
    }
}

This way you can access IsLoaded from MyClass, and make sure that only Load overrides are changing the _isLoaded property.

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