Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have declared two global variables of same name in C. It should give error as we cannot declare same name variables in same storage class.

I have checked it in C++ — it gives a compile time error, but not in C. Why?

Following is the code:

int a;
int a = 25;
int main()
{

   return 0;
}

Check it out at : Code Written at Ideone

I think this probably is the reason

Declaration and Definition in C

But this is not the case in C++. I think in C++, whether the variable is declared at global scope or auto scope the declaration and definition is happening at the same time.

Could anyone throw some more light on it.

Now when I define the variable two times giving it value two times it gives me error (instead of one declaration and one definition).

Code at : Two definitions now

int a;
int a;
int a;
int a = 25;

int main()
{
return 0;
}

Thanks Mats for the explanation.

share|improve this question
    
@H2CO3 .. thanks for your suggestion but i was just trying to understand what was going on in it. But there are some situation where you can't even avoid the use the global variables. –  ATul Singh Jun 30 '13 at 8:48
add comment

1 Answer

In C, multiple global variables are "merged" into one. So you have indeed just one global variable, declared multiple times. This goes back to a time when extern wasn't needed (or possibly didn't exist - not quite sure) in C.

In other words, this is valid in C for historical reasons so that we can still compile code written before there was a ANSI standard for C.

Although, to allow the code to be used in C++, I would suggest avoiding it.

share|improve this answer
    
I couldn't get the statement "Multiple Global Variables are "merged" into one. I have now defined the first one also,, and now its giving compile time error. –  ATul Singh Jun 30 '13 at 8:24
    
In other words, all global variables with the same name will be converted to be one variable - so your int a; and int a = 25; will be referring to the same int-sized piece of memory. –  Mats Petersson Jun 30 '13 at 8:24
    
Formally called tentative definition in C. You can tentatively define an object as many times as you want in a single translation unit and they'll be "merged" and resulting type is the composite of all tentative definitions. In your case, it's just int. –  Blue Moon Jun 30 '13 at 8:26
    
@KingsIndian But when i tentatively define two variable in global scope with same name it gives me error :: I am assuming ` int a; //to be declaration at global scope and int a = 12 ; //to be definition at global scope.. ` –  ATul Singh Jun 30 '13 at 8:32
    
Well, obviously, if you give it a value, the compiler has to generate something to define that variables values. If you do that twice, it will be an error, because you would end up with two distinct variables with one name - which one do you want to use? You are only allowed to give it a value once. –  Mats Petersson Jun 30 '13 at 8:36
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.