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I have the file sorted.txt:

$cat sorted.txt  
bash  
fosh  
hack  
hack  

If I do uniq:

$uniq sorted.txt  
bash  
fosh  
hack  

If I do uniq -z I get:

$uniq -z sorted.txt  
bash  
fosh  
hack  
hack  

I.e. in uniq -z I get duplicates! I was expecting that the only difference in the output of uniq sorted.txt and uniq -z sorted.txt is the separating character.
Why am I getting duplicates in uniq -z?

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1 Answer 1

The -z option tells uniq to use a 0 byte instead of newline as the separator between records. Since your file doesn't have any 0 bytes, it's treated as one record.

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So it first converts the \n to a \0 which effectively makes a single record and then tries to remove duplicates but since it is a single record it does not find duplicates?But then why does it print this single record in multiple lines if \n has already been removed? –  Jim Jun 30 '13 at 11:19
3  
It doesn't convert anything. It's looking for \0 in the input as the record separator. It treats \n as an ordinary character within the records. –  Barmar Jun 30 '13 at 11:22
    
iow, the output is exactly as the input, which is considered as one single long entry. If you use an unsorted file, the result will be more apparent. See uniq(1) –  didierc Jun 30 '13 at 12:39

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